Dim Display on Whirlpool Built-in Oven? Check for Corroded Wire Nuts. RBD YGBD Series

Another troubleshooting tip from a PCB repair company.

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A very nice lady from Houston sent us the oven controller from her Whirlpool RBD275 built-in double oven. We rebuilt and returned … then got it back a while later with a note saying the display is very dim. We powered it up on our test bench and the display looks great. After discussions w/nice lady the syptoms were: I can read the blue clock ok (but not great), I can’t read the temp display after a few seconds of starting bake.

 

So, long story short … wire nut connections on the main power feed to her oven are corroded … a few seconds after you push “start” the bake relay kicks in and draws high current causing the control board voltage to droop.

On the bench we hooked up a Variac (variable transformer) to test at proper and then compare to drooped voltage. You can see in the pictures that at full voltage display looks great (lower)  but with the line voltage dropped to 91V (upper) you can still read clock but the orange digits are almost gone. It’s a characteristic of the display technology (vacuum flourescent display – VFD).

 

It’s a good quick visual to see failing breakers and oxidized wire nuts (at least once they’re degraded enough to add about 0.5 ohms of resistance to power feed).

Simulated affect of voltage drop across faulty wire-nuts

Simulated effect of voltage drop across faulty wire-nuts

Part numbers:

4451856, 4451991, 4452890, 4452898, 4453664, 8301345, 8301908, 8301917, 8302319, 8302967, 8303817, 8303883, 4451992, 4452891, 8302966.

Model Numbers:

GBD277PDB09, GBD277PDB10, GBD277PDB2, GBD277PDB3, GBD277PDB4, GBD277PDB5, GBD277PDB6, GBD277PDB7, GBD277PDB8, GBD277PDQ09, GBD277PDQ10, GBD277PDQ2, GBD277PDQ3, GBD277PDQ4, GBD277PDQ5, GBD277PDQ6, GBD277PDQ7, GBD277PDQ8, GBD277PDS09, GBD277PDS10, GBD277PDS2, GBD277PDS3, GBD277PDS4, GBD277PDS5, GBD277PDS6, GBD277PDS7, GBD277PDS8, GBD277PDT09, GBD277PDT10, GBD277PDT7, GBD277PDT8, GBD277PRB00, GBD277PRB01, GBD277PRB03, GBD277PRQ00, GBD277PRQ01, GBD277PRQ03, GBD277PRS00, GBD277PRS01, GBD277PRS02, GBD277PRS03, GBD277PRT00, GBD307PDB09, GBD307PDB10, GBD307PDB2, GBD307PDB3, GBD307PDB4, GBD307PDB5, GBD307PDB6, GBD307PDB7, GBD307PDQ09, GBD307PDQ10, GBD307PDQ2, GBD307PDQ3, GBD307PDQ4, GBD307PDQ5, GBD307PDQ6, GBD307PDQ7, GBD307PDS09, GBD307PDS10, GBD307PDS2, GBD307PDS3, GBD307PDS4, GBD307PDS5, GBD307PDS6, GBD307PDS7, GBD307PDT09, GBD307PDT10, GBD307PDT3, GBD307PDT4, GBD307PDT5, GBD307PDT6, GBD307PDT7, GBD307PRB00, GBD307PRB01, GBD307PRB03, GBD307PRQ00, GBD307PRQ01, GBD307PRS00, GBD307PRS01, GBD307PRS02, GBD307PRT00, GBD307PRY01, KBRP36MHT00, KBRP36MHW00, LTG6234DT5, RBD245PDB10, RBD245PDB11, RBD245PDB12, RBD245PDB14, RBD245PDB15, RBD245PDB7, RBD245PDB8, RBD245PDB9, RBD245PDQ10, RBD245PDQ11, RBD245PDQ12, RBD245PDQ14, RBD245PDQ15, RBD245PDQ7, RBD245PDQ8, RBD245PDQ9, RBD245PDS12, RBD245PDS14, RBD245PDS15, RBD245PDT10, RBD245PDT11, RBD245PDT12, RBD245PDT14, RBD245PDT15, RBD245PDT8, RBD245PDT9, RBD245PRB00, RBD245PRQ00, RBD245PRS00, RBD245PRS01, RBD245PRT00, RBD275PDB10, RBD275PDB11, RBD275PDB12, RBD275PDB13, RBD275PDB14, RBD275PDB15, RBD275PDB7, RBD275PDB8, RBD275PDB9, RBD275PDQ10, RBD275PDQ11, RBD275PDQ12, RBD275PDQ13, RBD275PDQ14, RBD275PDQ15, RBD275PDQ7, RBD275PDQ8, RBD275PDQ9, RBD275PDS12, RBD275PDS14, RBD275PDS15, RBD275PDT10, RBD275PDT11, RBD275PDT12, RBD275PDT13, RBD275PDT14, RBD275PDT15, RBD275PDT8, RBD275PDT9, RBD275PRB00, RBD275PRQ00, RBD275PRS00, RBD275PRS01, RBD275PRT00, RBD276PDB10, RBD276PDB11, RBD276PDB12, RBD276PDB7, RBD276PDB8, RBD276PDB9, RBD276PDQ10, RBD276PDQ11, RBD276PDQ12, RBD276PDQ7, RBD276PDQ8, RBD276PDQ9, RBD277PDB1, RBD277PDB2, RBD277PDB4, RBD277PDQ1, RBD277PDQ2, RBD277PDQ4, RBD305PDB10, RBD305PDB11, RBD305PDB12, RBD305PDB13, RBD305PDB14, RBD305PDB15, RBD305PDB7, RBD305PDB8, RBD305PDB9, RBD305PDQ10, RBD305PDQ11, RBD305PDQ12, RBD305PDQ13, RBD305PDQ14, RBD305PDQ15, RBD305PDQ7, RBD305PDQ8, RBD305PDQ9, RBD305PDS12, RBD305PDS14, RBD305PDS15, RBD305PDT11, RBD305PDT12, RBD305PDT13, RBD305PDT14, RBD305PDT15, RBD305PRB00, RBD305PRQ00, RBD305PRS00, RBD305PRT00, RBD306PDB10, RBD306PDB11, RBD306PDB12, RBD306PDB13, RBD306PDB14, RBD306PDB15, RBD306PDB7, RBD306PDB8, RBD306PDB9, RBD306PDQ10, RBD306PDQ11, RBD306PDQ12, RBD306PDQ13, RBD306PDQ14, RBD306PDQ15, RBD306PDQ7, RBD306PDQ8, RBD306PDQ9, RBD306PDT11, RBD306PDT12, RBD306PDT13, RBD306PDT14, RBD306PDT15, RBD306PDZ10, RBD306PDZ7, RBD306PDZ8, RBD306PDZ9, YGBD307PDQ6, YGBD307PDB7, YGBD307PDQ7

Note, The text for this article was taken directly from a recent post on http://appliantology.org/topic/42157-whirlpool-oven-dim-display-and-wire-nuts

Home Diagnostics for Your RDD, RDS, RDF, RED, REF, RES Thermador Oven Range Cooktop Stove

Is your Thermador oven throwing error codes, not heating to set temp., or malfunctioning in other ways?

You may need to have your control board repaired, but the problem could also be failing hardware in your oven.

Luckily, these boards have a built-in diagnostic feature that can tell you where the problem is.  To enter the diagnostic mode, you need to have the breaker to your oven shut off.  Hold down the “Stop Time” button (center button) and have a friend turn the breaker back on.  Until the button is depressed, the control will beep and show the microprocessor ID in blue digits and dashes in red digits.  Once “Stop Time” is depressed, the control will stop beeping and show dashes in both the blue and red digits.

14-33-347,486752

Display shows Microprocessor ID and dashes when you enter Diagnostics Mode.

From here, you can test all the various functions of the oven control.

Holding any of the cooking buttons (Convection, Bake, or Broil) will energize that element relay while the button is held in, and the display will show “ON”.  You should hear a *click* whenever the relay turns on or off.  Depressing the button turns the relay off.

Holding the Clock button will energize the door latch relay and illuminate all display segments.

Holding the Stop Time button will cause the board to beep and show the same screen as when you entered Diagnostics: 4 digit Microprocessor ID and dashes.

Holding the Cook Time Button will show the  EEPROM checksum in blue digits and the current oven sensor temperature in red.

Holding the Timer button will cause the control board to beep.

Holding the Clean button will reveal the current state of the door latch.  Depending on which revision of the control board you have, there are 4 possible conditions, represented by either numbers 0-3 or 4-7…

  • 0 or 4: Latch in transition between states. Unlock Switch 1 and Lock Switch 2 are both open.
  • 1 or 5: Fully Latched (door closed). Unlock Switch 1 is open and Lock Switch 2 is closed.
  • 2 or 6: Fully Unlatched. Unlock Switch 1 is closed and Lock Switch 2 is open.
  • 3 or 7: Invalid Latch State. Unlock Switch 1 and Lock Switch 2 are both closed.

Pressing Cancel/Clear/Off will exit the Diagnostic Mode.

 

 

So, this is a powerful troubleshooting tool.  For example, if your oven isn’t heating properly, use diagnostic mode to figure out which element isn’t heating.  Hold Bake, you should hear the Bake relay click, and the Bake element (bottom) should heat as long as the button is held in.  If you hear the click, but there’s no heat, check the wiring to the element and the element itself (hardware specs below).  If the hardware is good, then the control board needs to be sent in for repair.  Even if the relay clicks, it can still have bad contacts.

Or, perhaps the oven isn’t heating properly because there is a failure in the temperature sensing circuit.  Hold the Cook Time button to reveal the oven sensor temperature.  If the oven has been idling at room temperature, then the red digits should display something around “070” (70 degrees).  Anything drastically different than this means there is a definite problem.  Check the wiring to the oven sensor and the sensor itself.  If the hardware is good, then the control board needs to be sent in for repair.

There are is a variety of possible failures for these ovens.  Using the diagnostics mode can help you find which circuit is faulty, and then you can use the table below to determine whether it’s a hardware problem or control board problem.

 

DANGER HIGH VOLTAGE!  You do not need power to the oven to make these measurements. Please cut the breaker.

HARDWARE TERMINALS RESULT
Bake Element E6** 18-26 Ω
Broil Element E7** 12-20 Ω
Convection Motor E2 to E8 55-80 Ω
Latch Motor E2 to E5 835-870 Ω
Temperature Sensor J1: pins 3 to 5 ~1080 Ω at Room Temp

**NOTE: The motors and sensor checks test the hardware and relevant wiring simultaneously.  There’s no good way to test the heating elements and their wiring at the same time.  Check the resistance of the elements at the ends of the element, and then individually inspect the wires from the ends of the elements.

 

This troubleshooting guide applies to the following Part and Model numbers…

P/N: 14-33-347, 35-00-571, 35-00-751, 486752, 487604

M/N: RDSS30, RDDS30V, RDFS30, RDDS30VQB, RDF30, RDF30QW, RED30V, RDDS30VRS, RDDS30VQB, RDDS30, RDF30RS, RDDS30QW, RES30, REF30QW, RES30QB, RDF30QB, RED30VQRS, REF30QB, RES30RS, RDF30RS, RED30VQB, RED30VQRS, RED30VQW, REF30QB, REF30QW, REF30RS, RES30QB, RES30W

WB27K5040 Conversion Kit – JTP10 JTP11 JTP13 JTP14 JTP15 Series GE Built-In Double Ovens

A vast majority of the time, no longer available  electronic controllers can be rebuilt to function like new.    In some cases, these obsolete controllers have so much damage that a rebuild is not feasible.   Don’t worry, there is still another option to avoid a costly appliance purchase.  WWW.FixYourBoard.com can modify your front panel to accommodate a new controller!  This blog illustrates the minor wiring modifications that are needed for some common GE controllers.

Parts:  WB27K5040, WB27K5190, WB27K5195, WB27K5123, WB27X5584, WB27K5054, WB27X5572, WB12K005, WB12K006, WB27K5073, WB27X5482

Models: JBP48AY1, JBP48WY1, JBP79AV1, JBP79AV2, JBP79AW1, JBP79AY1, JBP79GV1, JBP79GV2, JBP79GW1, JBP79WS2, JDP36GP3AD, JDP36GP3WH, JDP37GP3BG, JDP39WR1, JDP39WR3WH, JKP13GP1, JKP13GP2BG, JKP13GP3BG, JKP13GP4BG, JKP13GT1BB, JKP13GV1BB, JKP14WP1, JKP14WP2WG, JKP14WP3WG, JKP14WT1WW, JKP14WV1WW, JKP15AV1AA, JKP26GP1, JKP26GP2BG, JKP26GP3BG, JKP26GP4BG, JKP26GV1BB, JKP27WP1, JKP27WP2WG, JKP27WP3WG, JKP27WV1WW, JMP28GR1AD, JMP28GR1WH, JMP29GR1BK, JMP31WR1WH, JMP32AR1AG, JSP69BVBB, JSP69WVWW, JSS26GP2BG, JTP10GP, JTP10GS1BG, JTP10GS2BG, JTP10GS3BG, JTP10GS4BG, JTP11WP, JTP11WS1WG, JTP11WS2WG, JTP11WS3WG, JTP11WS4WG, JTP13GT1BB, JTP13GV1BB, JTP13GV2BB, JTP14WT1WW, JTP14WV1WW, JTP14WV2WW, JTP15BW1BB, JTP15WW1WW, JTP15WW2WW and more

WB27K5040 Conversion Kit – JTP10 JTP11 JTP13 JTP14 JTP15 Series GE Built-In Double Ovens

WB27K5040 Conversion Kit – JTP10 JTP11 JTP13 JTP14 JTP15 Series GE Built-In Double Ovens

Thats it, follow the illustration above and you will be cooking in no time!  Remember www.fixyourboard.com for a all your electronic control board problems.

Dead Whirlpool? Built-In Oven 2DLSQ KAWE6 KEBI2 KEBS2 Series – No Beeps or Light

Another troubleshooting tip from www.FixYourBoard.com :

Dead Whirlpool Board?  Look like this?  If so, continue.

Whirlpool Control Board

8301924, 8301924, 4451986 Built In Oven Controller

Relevant Boards: 4448871, 8301924, 4451986

Relevant Models: 2DLSQ8000JQ0, KAWE660WAL1, KEBS207DAL1, KEBS207DAL2, KEBS207DAL4, KEBS207DAL6, KEBS207DBL1, KEBS207DBL2, KEBS207DBL4, KEBS207DBL6, KEBI206DBL8, KEBI206DWH8, KEBI276DBL7, KEBI276DWH7, KEBS207DBL7, KEBS207DBL8, KEBS207DBT7, KEBS207DBT8, KEBS207DWH7, KEBS207DWH8.

Since these control boards get a full functional test before leaving your facility, the unresponsive/dead control board is probably due to the transformer.  With an AC meter, this can easily be checked at the P17 / P800 10 pin connector.   The referred connector is the one shown below that is connected to the transformer:

P19 or P800 10 Pin Molex Connector

P19 or P800 10 Pin Molex Connector on Side of Board

Simply check the following voltages with your meter in AC mode.  The voltages are specified on the transformer.  If any of the secondary voltages (not black and white wires that should be 120V) are zero, you need a new transformer.

Black to White – 120Volts AC.  This is the input to the transformer so if this is bad, the problem may not be the transformer.  The input power going to P15

Brown to Brown – 25Volts AC

Yellow to Yellow – 23Volts AC

Purple to Purple – 7Volts AC

It is written on the transformer:

Common Whirlpool Transformer 9760589

Transformer for 4448871, 8301924, 4451986

In summary:

-If the the high voltage (120V on black and white) is zero then the input power into the board (check your wiring diagram) needs to be checked.

-If any of the low voltage measurements (less than 30V) are zero, replace the transformer and you should be good.

-If the input power to the board is 120V but the black and white 120V wires on the transformer are zero, the board is the problem.

Hope this helps.  If you are confident that the board is the issue, these can be fixed quickly and reliable at www.fixyourboard.com

Temperature Control Problems and F2,F3,F1 error codes with Whirlpool Series RB160 RB170 RS675 Built-In Ovens

If your oven has a controller that looks like this and has erratic temperature control issues, it is very likely a problem with the controller.  At www.FixYourBoard.com we commonly get questions regarding these controllers.

The electronic controllers can be referred to as any of the following: 3169255, 3169256, 3169257, 3169258,  3169259,  3182391, 3182392, 3184943

 

When the  temperature is erratic and the oven frequently has trouble reaching temperature, even an experienced tech may have difficulty troubleshooting.  It is difficult to nail down because once the temperature control circuit begins to fail, you will see heating elements not coming on or staying on too long at random times.  This can also lead to F1,F2 or F3 errors.  The good news is that any of these controllers can be rebuild quickly and reliably with a  success rate that is over 95%.

List of Whirlpool model numbers:

WPLRM770PXAB0, RB160PXBB0, RB160PXBB1, RB160PXBB2, RB160PXBQ0, RB160PXYB0, RB160PXYB2, RB160PXYB3,  RB160PXYB4,  RB160PXYQ0,  RB160PXYQ2,  RB160PXYQ3,  RB160PXYQ4, RB160PXYQ6,  RB170AM,  RB170PXBB, RS6755xyn, RB760PXB, RB270PXYB, RB260PXYB, RB260PXBB2,  RB270PXYB, RB260PXBQ2, RB770PXBB1, RB770PXYB, RB770PXYB5, RS696PXBB2,  RM765PXAB0, RM770PXBB2, RF396PXYN, RFB260PXBQ2, RF385PXYQ1,

 

Unscramble Codes E1,E2,E3,E4,E5,E6,E7,E8,E9,E10,E11,E12,E13,E14,E15 For Thermador CT127, CT130, CT230 Models

The most common codes we see at www.fixyourboard.com are E3,E4, E10,  but here is the full list for CT127, CT130, CT230, CMT22 models:

Does your Thermador Controller look like this?  Below is the full list of codes and the meaning according to Thermador:

ERC_CT127_CT130_CT230

ERC For CT127_CT130_CT230

Error Code:     E1
Cause:     Control Board
Example:     Disables clean in both ovens; allow cooking
Corrective Action:     Replace control board

Error Code:     E2
Cause:     Sensor or Control Board
Example:     Oven temp over 625F or clean temp over 890F
Corrective Action:     Check sensor

Error Code:     E3
Cause:     Open Sensor
Example:     Disables cooking in affected oven
Corrective Action:     Check sensor

Error Code:     E4
Cause:     Shorted sensor
Example:     Disables cooking in affected oven
Corrective Action:     Check sensor

Error Code:     E5
Cause:     Control Board
Example:     Disables clean in both ovens; cooking useable
Corrective Action:     Replace control board

Error Code:     E6
Cause:     Selector Switch
Example:     Disables individual cook modes in affected oven
Corrective Action:     Check all functions; replace selector switch if one-piece Dreefs; replace control board

Error Code:     E7
Cause:     Control Board
Example:     Remains in display; oven unusable
Corrective Action:     Replace control board

Error Code:     E8
Cause:     Control Board
Example:     Remains in display; oven unusable
Corrective Action:     Replace control board

Error Code:     E9
Cause:     Latch
Example:     Latch motor may run but switches do not cycle
Corrective Action:     Replace latch in affected oven

Error Code:     E10
Cause:     Control Board
Example:     Checksum error
Corrective Action:     Replace Dreefs board

Error Code:     E11
Cause:     Latch Problem
Example:     Will not clean
Corrective Action:     Replace latch in affected oven

Error Code:     E12
Cause:     Latch Problem
Example:     Will not clean
Corrective Action:     Replace latch in affected oven

Error Code:     E13
Cause:     Latch Problem
Example:     Latch does not run
Corrective Action:     Check for voltage to latch motor

Error Code:     E14
Cause:     Latch Problem
Example:     Loose latch switch
Corrective Action:     Check latch for proper operation

Error Code:     E15
Cause:     Control Board
Example:     Remains in display; oven unusable
Corrective Action:     Replace Dreefs board

The common parts and models that we see at www.fixyourboard.com are:

Parts: 368743, 369171, 431481, 35-00-536, 35-00-459

Models: CT127N01, CT127NPRS, CT130-03,  CT130S-03, CT227N01 CT23003, CT227NPRS, CT130S-03, CMT22NPRS

Whirlpool Double Oven (Gold, GBD, RBD series) not heating? Could be an open thermal fuse.

Hello!

Today’s article will help you figure out why the bake/broil elements in your oven(s) aren’t heating up, even though the control panel seems to be operating perfectly.  In fact, you may even have recently received a refurbished/repaired control unit from www.FixYourBoard.com, but the oven still won’t heat up.  Fear no longer – this blog will get you on the right track in no time.

This guide is for troubleshooting Whirlpool double ovens – please refer to the list of relevant part and model numbers at the bottom of this blog to ensure you are in the right place.

First off, does your control panel seem to be functional? If the display isn’t illuminated, and there are no beeps when you press buttons, but you’re positive you’ve properly hooked up the control board and have the breaker on, then you may have an issue with the power supply to the control board.  Please refer to this guide for troubleshooting the power supply.

So everything seems to be properly connected.   You set the oven to bake, the display shows that the heat is on (the door needs to be closed), but the oven elements aren’t heating up at all, and the control is not throwing any error codes.  This is almost certainly being cause by an open “oven shutdown thermal fuse”.  There is one of these fuses for both the lower oven and the upper oven, each.  Hopefully, you’re only having this problem in one of the two, but it wouldn’t be too surprising if both thermal fuses went out, and it’s not hard to replace them.   Now, if the elements do heat up, even if it’s just a little bit, then the problem is either with the oven (temperature) sensor or the oven control board – please refer to this blog for troubleshooting that issue.

 

CUT THE BREAKER!!! These next steps involve measuring circuit elements that run at HIGH VOLTAGE WHICH CAN KILL YOU when the breaker is on.

You’ll want to have a DMM or DVM (Digital Multi/Voltage Meter) that can measure electrical resistance.  There is a large variety of inexpensive meters available.  Below are two different kinds of meters – both are set to check for electrical resistance of up to 200 ohms (Ω).  Set your meter to the 200 Ω scale, and make sure the probes are connected to the common (black) and voltage (red) ports.

Typical Digital Multi-Meter (DMM) set to the 200 Ω scale.

Typical Digital Multi-Meter (DMM) set to the 200 Ω scale.

First, let’s make sure the actual heating elements are not the problem.  You need to have the control board exposed, but still hooked up to the oven, and THE BREAKER SHOULD BE OFF. Near the element relays are the wiring tabs where the heating elements connect to the control board.  The upper oven elements are fed by the set of tabs labeled P18.  There should be two black wires on the two center tabs, and a red wire and an orange wire which connect to the outside tabs.  Stick your probes into the sockets where the orange and red wires connect to the board – you should be in the ballpark of 50 Ω.  The lower oven is fed by the other set of tabs, labeled P26.  Here, we want to stick the probes into the sockets occupied by the red (outside) and orange (center) wires – should also be around 50 Ω.   If these measurements check out, skip the rest of this paragraph.  If either one of these measurements are significantly far from 50 Ω (e.g. <35 Ω or >65 Ω) , or especially if the meter over-ranges (usually meters display a “1” on the far right of the screen when they over-range), then you need to individually inspect the element(s) in question.  Oven models are unique so I can’t give specific information on how to extract the heating elements from the oven cavity – you may want to have a technician do this with you – but it’s usually just a matter of removing some mounting screws, and you may have to get behind the oven to disconnect the wiring.  The heating elements are essentially long metal rods bent into a radiator-like shape (they’re basically radiators, after all).  The resistance from end-to-end of a broil (top) element should be about 20 Ω, and it should be about 30 Ω for a bake (bottom) element.  If any of these elements fail to meet approximate spec, they should probably be replaced – contact a technician.  If the elements are fine, but the measurements on the control board were bad, then it’s a wiring/connection issue.

So the elements aren’t the problem, but the thermal fuses could still definitely be bad – let’s see.  For these ovens, there are two different styles of control boards, which we’ll refer to as 2319 and 2697.  The easy way to tell which one you have is by looking at the right side of the back of the board: if it has two DLB (Double Line Break; photos below) relays, then it is a 2319, otherwise it’s a 2967.  Go to the appropriate paragraph.

Whirlpool Double Oven Control Board 8302967 – no DLB relays.

Whirlpool Double Oven Control Board 8302319 – has DLB relays.

Often, Whirlpool Control Board 8302319 is in a Plastic Case.

Troubleshooting 2319

Your board has the DLB relays.   Let’s check the upper oven thermal fuse first.  The upper oven DLB relay should have two solid red wires connected to it, and we need to figure out which one to use for the fuse test.  First, with your meter set to the 200 Ω scale, hold a probe to each of the contacts for the red wires – it should over-range, meaning that it is an open circuit (if your meter registers any resistance within the 200 Ω scale, then the relay is stuck and you need to send the board to www.FixYourBoard.com to be repaired).  Now, look at the other (lower oven) DLB relay.  This one should have one solid red wire, and one red wire with a white stripe.  The solid red wire on the lower oven DLB relay should be in closed circuit to one of the solid red wires on the upper oven DLB relay, and it should be open circuit to the other solid red wire.  Use your meter to find out which one – the meter should register a value (somewhere around 20-30 Ω) for the closed circuit, and it should over-range for the open circuit.  We want to use the solid red wire on the upper oven DLB that is open circuit to the solid red wire on the lower oven DLB.  Hold one of the probes to the contact for that solid red wire, and stick the other probe into either the orange or red wire socket connected to the P18 tabs.  This should be a closed circuit.  If it is an open circuit, the upper oven thermal fuse is open and needs to be replaced – take a note of that for now.

Now let’s look at the lower oven thermal fuse.  Hold one of your probes to the contact for the red wire with a white stripe that connects to the lower oven DLB relay.  Stick the other probe into the orange wire socket connected to the P26 tabs.  This should be a closed circuit.  If it is an open circuit, the upper oven thermal fuse is open and needs to be replaced.  Skip the 2967 troubleshooting paragraph to see about replacing these fuses.

Troubleshooting 2967

Your board does not have the DLB relays.  With your meter set to the 200 Ω scale, stick one of the probes into the socket for either the red or the orange wire that connects to the P18 tabs on the board.  Stick the other probe into the socket for the orange wire that connects to the P26 tabs.  In normal conditions, this should be a closed circuit – the meter should read a value around 40-60 Ω.  If the meter over-ranges, then either one or both of the thermal fuses are open.

Bad Thermal Fuse

The meter has told us one or both of the thermal fuses are bad.  These are mounted on the rear panel(s) of the oven(s), so you’re going to have to pull the double oven out from the kitchen wall to access them.  Open up the rear panel(s) of the oven(s) (some hardware will probably required), and you should find the thermal fuses mounted on the panel.  A red wire and an orange wire should be connected to one side of the fuse, while just one red wire is connected to the other side of the fuse.  This will be true of both the upper and lower thermal fuses, with one exception: if your oven is not self-cleaning, the lower thermal fuse will only have one orange wire on one side and one red wire on the other.  Disconnect the wiring and unmount the suspect fuse(s).  Use your meter to verify that the fuse(s) is/are open – holding one probe to each of the contacts should result in over-ranging in the 200 Ω scale if the fuse is open.  Contact a local appliance parts supplier or a site like www.RepairClinic.com to find the necessary replacement according to the part number and/or color markings on the fuse…

Color Markings___________Whirlpool Part Number

Pink/White Stripe__________4452223

Yellow/White Stripe________4451442

Red ____________________4450934

Orange/White Stripe________4450334

Blue____________________4450250

Green/White Stripe_________4450249

Blue/White Stripe__________8300802

Well that wraps it up! Hope all goes well in the kitchen, and always feel free to contact www.FixYourBoard.com for inquiries into control board repair/maintenance.

-Young Padawan

Model Numbers:

GBD277PDB09, GBD277PDB10, GBD277PDB2, GBD277PDB3, GBD277PDB4, GBD277PDB5, GBD277PDB6, GBD277PDB7, GBD277PDB8, GBD277PDQ09, GBD277PDQ10, GBD277PDQ2, GBD277PDQ3, GBD277PDQ4, GBD277PDQ5, GBD277PDQ6, GBD277PDQ7, GBD277PDQ8, GBD277PDS09, GBD277PDS10, GBD277PDS2, GBD277PDS3, GBD277PDS4, GBD277PDS5, GBD277PDS6, GBD277PDS7, GBD277PDS8, GBD277PDT09, GBD277PDT10, GBD277PDT7, GBD277PDT8, GBD277PRB00, GBD277PRB01, GBD277PRB03, GBD277PRQ00, GBD277PRQ01, GBD277PRQ03, GBD277PRS00, GBD277PRS01, GBD277PRS02, GBD277PRS03, GBD277PRT00, GBD307PDB09, GBD307PDB10, GBD307PDB2, GBD307PDB3, GBD307PDB4, GBD307PDB5, GBD307PDB6, GBD307PDB7, GBD307PDQ09, GBD307PDQ10, GBD307PDQ2, GBD307PDQ3, GBD307PDQ4, GBD307PDQ5, GBD307PDQ6, GBD307PDQ7, GBD307PDS09, GBD307PDS10, GBD307PDS2, GBD307PDS3, GBD307PDS4, GBD307PDS5, GBD307PDS6, GBD307PDS7, GBD307PDT09, GBD307PDT10, GBD307PDT3, GBD307PDT4, GBD307PDT5, GBD307PDT6, GBD307PDT7, GBD307PRB00, GBD307PRB01, GBD307PRB03, GBD307PRQ00, GBD307PRQ01, GBD307PRS00, GBD307PRS01, GBD307PRS02, GBD307PRT00, GBD307PRY01, KBRP36MHT00, KBRP36MHW00, LTG6234DT5, RBD245PDB10, RBD245PDB11, RBD245PDB12, RBD245PDB14, RBD245PDB15, RBD245PDB7, RBD245PDB8, RBD245PDB9, RBD245PDQ10, RBD245PDQ11, RBD245PDQ12, RBD245PDQ14, RBD245PDQ15, RBD245PDQ7, RBD245PDQ8, RBD245PDQ9, RBD245PDS12, RBD245PDS14, RBD245PDS15, RBD245PDT10, RBD245PDT11, RBD245PDT12, RBD245PDT14, RBD245PDT15, RBD245PDT8, RBD245PDT9, RBD245PRB00, RBD245PRQ00, RBD245PRS00, RBD245PRS01, RBD245PRT00, RBD275PDB10, RBD275PDB11, RBD275PDB12, RBD275PDB13, RBD275PDB14, RBD275PDB15, RBD275PDB7, RBD275PDB8, RBD275PDB9, RBD275PDQ10, RBD275PDQ11, RBD275PDQ12, RBD275PDQ13, RBD275PDQ14, RBD275PDQ15, RBD275PDQ7, RBD275PDQ8, RBD275PDQ9, RBD275PDS12, RBD275PDS14, RBD275PDS15, RBD275PDT10, RBD275PDT11, RBD275PDT12, RBD275PDT13, RBD275PDT14, RBD275PDT15, RBD275PDT8, RBD275PDT9, RBD275PRB00, RBD275PRQ00, RBD275PRS00, RBD275PRS01, RBD275PRT00, RBD276PDB10, RBD276PDB11, RBD276PDB12, RBD276PDB7, RBD276PDB8, RBD276PDB9, RBD276PDQ10, RBD276PDQ11, RBD276PDQ12, RBD276PDQ7, RBD276PDQ8, RBD276PDQ9, RBD277PDB1, RBD277PDB2, RBD277PDB4, RBD277PDQ1, RBD277PDQ2, RBD277PDQ4, RBD305PDB10, RBD305PDB11, RBD305PDB12, RBD305PDB13, RBD305PDB14, RBD305PDB15, RBD305PDB7, RBD305PDB8, RBD305PDB9, RBD305PDQ10, RBD305PDQ11, RBD305PDQ12, RBD305PDQ13, RBD305PDQ14, RBD305PDQ15, RBD305PDQ7, RBD305PDQ8, RBD305PDQ9, RBD305PDS12, RBD305PDS14, RBD305PDS15, RBD305PDT11, RBD305PDT12, RBD305PDT13, RBD305PDT14, RBD305PDT15, RBD305PRB00, RBD305PRQ00, RBD305PRS00, RBD305PRT00, RBD306PDB10, RBD306PDB11, RBD306PDB12, RBD306PDB13, RBD306PDB14, RBD306PDB15, RBD306PDB7, RBD306PDB8, RBD306PDB9, RBD306PDQ10, RBD306PDQ11, RBD306PDQ12, RBD306PDQ13, RBD306PDQ14, RBD306PDQ15, RBD306PDQ7, RBD306PDQ8, RBD306PDQ9, RBD306PDT11, RBD306PDT12, RBD306PDT13, RBD306PDT14, RBD306PDT15, RBD306PDZ10, RBD306PDZ7, RBD306PDZ8, RBD306PDZ9, YGBD307PDQ6, YGBD307PDB7, YGBD307PDQ7

Part Numbers:

4451856, 4451991, 4452890, 4452898, 4453664, 8301345, 8301908, 8301917, 8302319, 8302967, 8303817, 8303883, 4451992, 4452891, 8302966

Dead GE double oven? Transformer or Controller? Troubleshooting Guide

This guide will help you identify what problems you may have in the power supply to the electronics in your GE double oven.  Some symptoms you may be experiencing include, but are not limited to:
  • Blank display or no beeping
  • F1 error code
  • Oven seems dead

Generally, these are signs of a failed controller, but sometimes blank display or dead oven are simply the result of a failed transformer.  I say “simply” because it is much less expensive and much easier to replace/fix the transformer than it is the controller.  The objective of this post is to help you figure out which is the faulty part so you can send the right one to www.FixYourBoard.com to be repaired.

You’ll need an AC voltmeter as well as a basic tool set handy (pretty much just the right sized screwdriver).

The first thing to do is cut the breaker to your oven before you start taking it apart – we don’t want anybody getting killed by high voltage.

Next, you’ll need to expose your controller.  Refer to this post for help if you don’t know how to access the control unit.  There is no need to disconnect anything – that could actually make your measurements useless.  Once it’s exposed, make sure you can comfortably touch the various wiring harnesses with the voltmeter probes.  If it’s going to be a struggle, you may want to demount the unit from the panel to get some more slack.

Now, turn the breaker back on.  You’ll need to be very careful from here on.  Even though the controller is mostly a low voltage device, there are still points of high voltage on the relay board, and you can still cause electrical damage if you probe the wrong places.  Wall power goes into a transformer somewhere off the control module, and the transformer steps the wall power down to low voltage and routes that to the control board.  The low voltage comes into the board at the white wiring connector labeled J1.  It’s near the black connector receiving the clear, thin ribbon cable from the keypad (see photo).

The transformer sends two separate low voltages to the control board, 21.5 VAC and 4.6 VAC.  These voltages are approximate: as long is you’re in the ballpark, you should be good.  Also, it’s important to note that there are many variations of this control module.  Yours may look a bit different from the one depicted below, but you should still be getting the same supply from the transformer.  The photo shows a unit with all the wiring detached – yours should have a wiring harness occupying the J1 connector, but you should be able to stick the voltmeter probes along the wires into the sockets of the harness to take measurements.  If not, cut the breaker, disconnect the harness from J1 connector, turn the breaker back on, and probe the bottom side of the harness.  You should measure voltages according the photo.  Note that the empty slot is referred to as pins 3.

GE double oven electronic control board

Probes on pins 1 and 2 is one measurement. Probes on pins 4 and 5 is a separate measurement. The empty slot is referred to as Pin 3.

If you measure the proper voltages, then you know the transformer is not the issue.  Make sure the wiring harness is well connected, clean, and making good contact.  If you’re still having problems as described at the beginning, then the controller is the problem, and you should send it to FixYourBoard.com for repair.

If you aren’t reading these voltages, then you either have a bad transformer, or bad wiring.  Cut the breaker, and follow the wires back to the transformer.  These four wires come out of the secondary side of the transformer.  There should be another two wires going into the other side of the transformer, the primary side.  With the breaker on, you should measure 120VAC going into the primary.  I shouldn’t need to tell you how DANGEROUS 120VAC is.  If you measure 120VAC at the primary, check to see if you get 21.5 and 4.6 right at the secondary.  If not for either one, then the transformer is definitely bad and you should contact FixYourBoard.com for repair.  If you have these voltages right at the transformer, but not at the board, then the wiring has broken down somewhere between and needs to be fixed.  If you’re not getting 120VAC into the transformer primary, then you have a serious electrical wiring problem in your wall which should be addressed by a professional (e.g. electrician).

I hope you found this guide helpful! Remember you can always email info@fixyourboard.com with questions.

-Young Padawan

Jenn-Air ACB, JEW, JJW, MEW, SCE, SVD, and WW Series Built-In Ovens can’t keep time and can’t be calibrated? Solution is here.

We’ve seen a number of Jenn-Air ovens (relevant model/part numbers and photos of typical boards below) here at FixYourBoard.com with the same recurring problem…

The oven control seems unable to consistently keep the time (e.g. the display is often encountered flashing “12:00”), and the user calibration for the oven temperature is not saved after being set.

To set temperature calibration follow these steps:

  • Press “Bake” (upper bake will calibrate the upper oven, and lower bake will calibrate the lower oven)
  • Enter in “500” degrees
  • Hold down “Bake” again (the same bake as pressed at the start)
  • This should enter the calibration menu.  A number ranging from -35 to +35 (by increments of 5) should be displayed.  The default is “0”.
  • Press “Broil” to toggle between positive and negative ranges and then key in the desired offset (can only be from -35 to +35 by increments of 5).
  • Ex) a +20 degree offset will cause the oven controller to display “330” for an oven cavity that is actually 350 degrees.  Similarly, a -25 degree offset will cause the controller to display “425” for a cavity that is actually 400 degrees.
  • Press “Clear/Cancel” or just idle for a few seconds and the offset will be stored and the display will return to showing the clock.  So if you were to re-enter the calibration menu, it should show whatever number you just keyed in.

The control failure being addressed in this post is when you re-enter the calibration menu and it reads “0” or is blank instead of being stored at the desired offset.

Well we’ve discovered what’s causing this problem and know how to fix it.  Furthermore, we will refurbish the entire board, quickly and reliably, replacing all the components prone to failure and back it up with a two year warranty.  And the best part is that this repair is a fraction of the cost of buying a new controller, or worse yet, a new oven.  So send your malfunctioning controller in to FixYourBoard.com and we’ll get it back up and running like new in no time!

Relevant Jenn-Air model numbers:

ACB6260AB ACB6260AS ACB6260AW ACB6280AS

SCE30600B SCE30600BC SCE30600W SCE4320B SCE4320W SCE4340B SCE4340BC SCE70600B SCE70600W SCE30500W

SVD48600B SVD48600PF SVD48600PG SVD48600PK SVD48600PR SVD48600PT

MEW6627BAB MEW6627BAC MEW6627BAQ MEW6627BAS MEW6627BAW MEW6627CAS

JEW8527AAB JEW8527AAW JEW8530AAB JEW8530AAW JEW8627AAB JEW8627AAW JEW8630AAB JEW8630AAW JEW9627AAB JEW9627AAS JEW9627AAW JEW9630AAB JEW9630AAS JEW9630AAW JEW9527AAB JEW9527AAW JEW9530AAB JEW9530AAS JEW9530AAW

JJW8527AAB JJW8530CAB JJW8530CAS JJW8530CAW JJW8630CAB JJW8630CAS JJW8630CAW JJW8527CAB JJW8527CAS JJW8527CAW JJW8627CAB JJW8627CAS JJW8627CAW JJW9527CAB JJW9527CAQ JJW9527CAS JJW9527CAW JJW8530CCB JJW8530CCW JJW9530CCB JJW9530CCS JJW9530CCW JJW9630CCB JJW9630CCS JJW9630CCW

WW30430W WW27430B WW27430BC WW27430P WW27430PF WW27430PG WW27430PK WW27430PR WW27430PU WW27430W WW27430WC WW30430B WW30430P WW30430PC WW30430PF WW30430PG WW30430PK WW30430PR WW30430PU

Relevant Jenn-Air part numbers:

12001691 12001693 12001914 71001799 71001872 71001977 71002594 71003401 71003424 74006612 74006613 74006614

71001799

Single oven display - front

71001799

Single oven diplsay - rear

Double oven display - front

Double oven display - rear

Single/upper oven relay board


Lower oven relay board

Whirlpool RM278, RM288 series with common failures (Blanking display, F1, F2 and F3 errors, random resetting and beeping)

3148270, 3148271, 3148272, 3148273, 3148274, 3148275 are common control boards that have been showing up at www.FixYourBoard.com.   They fit into the following model numbers:  RM288PXS0, RM288PXV4, RM288PXV5,  RM288PXV6,  RM288PXV7,  RM278BXS0,  RM278BXV0,  RM278BXV2,  RM278BXV4,  RM278BXV5, RM278BXV6 ,RM278BXV7.  There are slight variations in color and functionality, but they are similar to the following:

The common failures are blanking display, random clock resets, F1, F2, F2 errors, and beeping/chirping noises.    No worries, all these symptoms can be repaired.  There is no reason to buy new as the warranty on refurbished timers is longer that a new.  Contact www.fixyourboard.com for more information.