Failed Dacor Touchpad Causing F1 or F7? CPD,CPS Built-In Ovens

Are you having trouble finding a keypad for your Dacor built in oven? Don’t worry, there are options!  For a fraction of an oven replacement you can have the functionality restored to your oven and avoid multiple thousands of dollars to replace a built-in oven. A simple keypad problem can turn into a headache due to a ‘no longer available’ (NLA) or obsolete touchpad. Most parts for Dacor ovens are available for a very long time but the touch pad seems to be an exception to this. This control panel is made of a sealed membrane switch that wears out over time. Once this part fails, the oven can become unresponsive, beep randomly or throw error codes like F1 and F7 codes.

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Recommended solution for Obsolete Dacor Panels

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“We received the keypad and installed it. It works great! Thank you do much! It sure beats buying a new double oven!” – Brad – Bethel, Ohio

 

Dacor Models that are applicable include CPS227 CPS227A CPS227B CPS227W CPD227 CPS230 CPS230B CPD230 CPS127 CPS127A CPS127S CPS127W CPS130 CPS130A CPS130B CPS130R CPS130S CPS130W CPS230W CPS230S CPS230A and others.

Ready to send your panel? Use the Amazon checkout process for “start to finish tracking”. Select you part to go the Amazon product page

13159A – Less than $300 on Amazon
13159B – Less than $300 on Amazon
13159W – Less than $300 on Amazon
13160B – Less than $300 on Amazon
13291B – Less than $300 on Amazon
13292A – Less than $300 on Amazon
13158B – Less than $300 on Amazon
13158S – Less than $300 on Amazon
13158W – Less than $300on Amazon
13290A – Less than $300 on Amazon
13290B – Less than $300 on Amazon
13290R – Less than $300 on Amazon
13290S – Less than $300 on Amazon
13290W – Less than $300 on Amazon
13291W – Less than $300 on Amazon
13291S – Less than $300 on Amazon
13291A – Less than $300 on Amazon
76480B – Less than $300 on Amazon

Don’t see your Dacor part number or model number or have questions? Contact info@applianceboards.com.

Electric Double Wall/Built-in Whirlpool Oven Dead? Could be open thermal fuse

Electronic Control Board for Whirpool Double Electric Oven

Electronic Control Board for Whirpool Double Electric Oven

 

Does your oven display look like this?  Is the oven completely dead, whether or not you’ve already had the control board rebuilt by a PCB repair company?  This is probably just the result of an open fuse in-line with the black “hot” wire to the control board transformer.

 

Check for continuity through thermal fuse in-line with black wire, then 120VAC across black and white wires

Check for continuity through thermal fuse in-line with black wire, then 120VAC across black and white wires

Use an ohmmeter to check for continuity through the fuse.  If open, it needs to be replaced.   If the fuse is OK, but the board is totally dead, check that there is 120VAC across the “hot” wire with fuse and white neutral wire in the caddy-corner wiring harness.  If you’re getting 120VAC there but the board is still completely dead, consult a PCB repair company to get the board repaired.

 

PART NUMBERS:

4448876, 4452242

MODEL NUMBERS: 

GBD277PDB0, GBD307PDQ0, RBD245PDB1, RBD245PDB2, RBD245PDB4, RBD245PDQ1, RBD245PDQ2, RBD245PDQ4, RBD275PD02, RBD275PDB1, RBD275PDB2, RBD275PDB3, RBD275PDB4, RBD275PDB6, RBD275PDD4, RBD275PDQ1, RBD275PDQ2, RBD275PDQ4, RBD277PDB1, RBD277PDB4, RBD305, RBD305PD04, RBD305PDB1, RBD305PDB2, RBD305PDB4, RBD305PDQ1, RBD305PDQ2, RBD305PDQ3, RBD305PDQ4, RBD305PDQ6, RBD306PDB1, RBD306PDB4, RBD306PDQ1, RBD307PDB4, RBD307PDQ1, RBD307PDQ2, RBD307PDQ4, GBD277PDB1, GBD307PD, GBD307PDQ1, GBD307PDQ10, GBD307PDS1, RBD245PDB6, RBD245PDQ6, RBD245PR, RBD275PDB6, RBD275PDQ6, RBD275PDQ8, RBD276PDB6, RBD276PDD6, RBD305PDB6, RBD305PDBG, RBD305PDQ6, RBD306PDB06, RBD306PDB6, RBD306PDQ6, RBD386PDQ6, RBD275PDB6, GBD277PDB1, RBD275PDQ6, RBD306PDB6, RBD245PDB6, GBD307PDS1, RBD306PDQ6, RBD306PDZ6, GBD277PDQ1, RBD276PDB6, GBD307PDB1, RBD245PDQ6, RBD276PDQ6, GBD277PDS1, GBD307PDQ1, GBD307PDT1, GDB277PDB1, GDB277PDQ1, RBD305PDQ6, RBD305PDB6, RBD275PDQ2, , RBD275PDB4, RBD305PDQ1, RBD305PDQ2, RBD306PDB1, , RBD245PDB1, RBD275PDB1, , RBD275PDQ1, , RBD275PDQ4, RBD305PDQ4, GBD307PDB0, RBD245PDQ4, RBD275PDB2, , RBD275PDQ3, RBD277PDQ2, RBD305PDB4, RBD305PDQ3, RBD245PDB3, RBD276PDQ2, RBD276PDQ4, RBD305PDB1, RBD305PDB2, RBD306PDQ1, RBD306PDQ4, GBD277PDB0, GBD277PDQ0, GBD307PDQ0, PBK1227, RBD245PDB2, RBD245PDB4, RBD245PDQ1, RBD245PDQ2, RBD245PDQ3, RBD275PDB3, RBD276PDB1, RBD276PDB2, RBD276PDB4, RBD276PDQ1, RBD277PDB1, RBD277PDB2, RBD277PDB4, RBD277PDQ1, RBD277PDQ4, RBD305PDB3, RBD306PDB2, RBD306PDB4, RBD306PDQ2, RBD306PDZ1, RBD306PDZ2, RBD306PDZ4, RBD307PDB1, RBD307PDB2, RBD307PDQ1, RBD307PDQ2, RBD307PDQ4

 

Whirlpool Double Oven (Gold, GBD, RBD series) not heating? Could be an open thermal fuse.

Hello!

Today’s article will help you figure out why the bake/broil elements in your oven(s) aren’t heating up, even though the control panel seems to be operating perfectly.  In fact, you may even have recently received a refurbished/repaired control unit from www.FixYourBoard.com, but the oven still won’t heat up.  Fear no longer – this blog will get you on the right track in no time.

This guide is for troubleshooting Whirlpool double ovens – please refer to the list of relevant part and model numbers at the bottom of this blog to ensure you are in the right place.

First off, does your control panel seem to be functional? If the display isn’t illuminated, and there are no beeps when you press buttons, but you’re positive you’ve properly hooked up the control board and have the breaker on, then you may have an issue with the power supply to the control board.  Please refer to this guide for troubleshooting the power supply.

So everything seems to be properly connected.   You set the oven to bake, the display shows that the heat is on (the door needs to be closed), but the oven elements aren’t heating up at all, and the control is not throwing any error codes.  This is almost certainly being cause by an open “oven shutdown thermal fuse”.  There is one of these fuses for both the lower oven and the upper oven, each.  Hopefully, you’re only having this problem in one of the two, but it wouldn’t be too surprising if both thermal fuses went out, and it’s not hard to replace them.   Now, if the elements do heat up, even if it’s just a little bit, then the problem is either with the oven (temperature) sensor or the oven control board – please refer to this blog for troubleshooting that issue.

 

CUT THE BREAKER!!! These next steps involve measuring circuit elements that run at HIGH VOLTAGE WHICH CAN KILL YOU when the breaker is on.

You’ll want to have a DMM or DVM (Digital Multi/Voltage Meter) that can measure electrical resistance.  There is a large variety of inexpensive meters available.  Below are two different kinds of meters – both are set to check for electrical resistance of up to 200 ohms (Ω).  Set your meter to the 200 Ω scale, and make sure the probes are connected to the common (black) and voltage (red) ports.

Typical Digital Multi-Meter (DMM) set to the 200 Ω scale.

Typical Digital Multi-Meter (DMM) set to the 200 Ω scale.

First, let’s make sure the actual heating elements are not the problem.  You need to have the control board exposed, but still hooked up to the oven, and THE BREAKER SHOULD BE OFF. Near the element relays are the wiring tabs where the heating elements connect to the control board.  The upper oven elements are fed by the set of tabs labeled P18.  There should be two black wires on the two center tabs, and a red wire and an orange wire which connect to the outside tabs.  Stick your probes into the sockets where the orange and red wires connect to the board – you should be in the ballpark of 50 Ω.  The lower oven is fed by the other set of tabs, labeled P26.  Here, we want to stick the probes into the sockets occupied by the red (outside) and orange (center) wires – should also be around 50 Ω.   If these measurements check out, skip the rest of this paragraph.  If either one of these measurements are significantly far from 50 Ω (e.g. <35 Ω or >65 Ω) , or especially if the meter over-ranges (usually meters display a “1” on the far right of the screen when they over-range), then you need to individually inspect the element(s) in question.  Oven models are unique so I can’t give specific information on how to extract the heating elements from the oven cavity – you may want to have a technician do this with you – but it’s usually just a matter of removing some mounting screws, and you may have to get behind the oven to disconnect the wiring.  The heating elements are essentially long metal rods bent into a radiator-like shape (they’re basically radiators, after all).  The resistance from end-to-end of a broil (top) element should be about 20 Ω, and it should be about 30 Ω for a bake (bottom) element.  If any of these elements fail to meet approximate spec, they should probably be replaced – contact a technician.  If the elements are fine, but the measurements on the control board were bad, then it’s a wiring/connection issue.

So the elements aren’t the problem, but the thermal fuses could still definitely be bad – let’s see.  For these ovens, there are two different styles of control boards, which we’ll refer to as 2319 and 2697.  The easy way to tell which one you have is by looking at the right side of the back of the board: if it has two DLB (Double Line Break; photos below) relays, then it is a 2319, otherwise it’s a 2967.  Go to the appropriate paragraph.

Whirlpool Double Oven Control Board 8302967 – no DLB relays.

Whirlpool Double Oven Control Board 8302319 – has DLB relays.

Often, Whirlpool Control Board 8302319 is in a Plastic Case.

Troubleshooting 2319

Your board has the DLB relays.   Let’s check the upper oven thermal fuse first.  The upper oven DLB relay should have two solid red wires connected to it, and we need to figure out which one to use for the fuse test.  First, with your meter set to the 200 Ω scale, hold a probe to each of the contacts for the red wires – it should over-range, meaning that it is an open circuit (if your meter registers any resistance within the 200 Ω scale, then the relay is stuck and you need to send the board to www.FixYourBoard.com to be repaired).  Now, look at the other (lower oven) DLB relay.  This one should have one solid red wire, and one red wire with a white stripe.  The solid red wire on the lower oven DLB relay should be in closed circuit to one of the solid red wires on the upper oven DLB relay, and it should be open circuit to the other solid red wire.  Use your meter to find out which one – the meter should register a value (somewhere around 20-30 Ω) for the closed circuit, and it should over-range for the open circuit.  We want to use the solid red wire on the upper oven DLB that is open circuit to the solid red wire on the lower oven DLB.  Hold one of the probes to the contact for that solid red wire, and stick the other probe into either the orange or red wire socket connected to the P18 tabs.  This should be a closed circuit.  If it is an open circuit, the upper oven thermal fuse is open and needs to be replaced – take a note of that for now.

Now let’s look at the lower oven thermal fuse.  Hold one of your probes to the contact for the red wire with a white stripe that connects to the lower oven DLB relay.  Stick the other probe into the orange wire socket connected to the P26 tabs.  This should be a closed circuit.  If it is an open circuit, the upper oven thermal fuse is open and needs to be replaced.  Skip the 2967 troubleshooting paragraph to see about replacing these fuses.

Troubleshooting 2967

Your board does not have the DLB relays.  With your meter set to the 200 Ω scale, stick one of the probes into the socket for either the red or the orange wire that connects to the P18 tabs on the board.  Stick the other probe into the socket for the orange wire that connects to the P26 tabs.  In normal conditions, this should be a closed circuit – the meter should read a value around 40-60 Ω.  If the meter over-ranges, then either one or both of the thermal fuses are open.

Bad Thermal Fuse

The meter has told us one or both of the thermal fuses are bad.  These are mounted on the rear panel(s) of the oven(s), so you’re going to have to pull the double oven out from the kitchen wall to access them.  Open up the rear panel(s) of the oven(s) (some hardware will probably required), and you should find the thermal fuses mounted on the panel.  A red wire and an orange wire should be connected to one side of the fuse, while just one red wire is connected to the other side of the fuse.  This will be true of both the upper and lower thermal fuses, with one exception: if your oven is not self-cleaning, the lower thermal fuse will only have one orange wire on one side and one red wire on the other.  Disconnect the wiring and unmount the suspect fuse(s).  Use your meter to verify that the fuse(s) is/are open – holding one probe to each of the contacts should result in over-ranging in the 200 Ω scale if the fuse is open.  Contact a local appliance parts supplier or a site like www.RepairClinic.com to find the necessary replacement according to the part number and/or color markings on the fuse…

Color Markings___________Whirlpool Part Number

Pink/White Stripe__________4452223

Yellow/White Stripe________4451442

Red ____________________4450934

Orange/White Stripe________4450334

Blue____________________4450250

Green/White Stripe_________4450249

Blue/White Stripe__________8300802

Well that wraps it up! Hope all goes well in the kitchen, and always feel free to contact www.FixYourBoard.com for inquiries into control board repair/maintenance.

-Young Padawan

Model Numbers:

GBD277PDB09, GBD277PDB10, GBD277PDB2, GBD277PDB3, GBD277PDB4, GBD277PDB5, GBD277PDB6, GBD277PDB7, GBD277PDB8, GBD277PDQ09, GBD277PDQ10, GBD277PDQ2, GBD277PDQ3, GBD277PDQ4, GBD277PDQ5, GBD277PDQ6, GBD277PDQ7, GBD277PDQ8, GBD277PDS09, GBD277PDS10, GBD277PDS2, GBD277PDS3, GBD277PDS4, GBD277PDS5, GBD277PDS6, GBD277PDS7, GBD277PDS8, GBD277PDT09, GBD277PDT10, GBD277PDT7, GBD277PDT8, GBD277PRB00, GBD277PRB01, GBD277PRB03, GBD277PRQ00, GBD277PRQ01, GBD277PRQ03, GBD277PRS00, GBD277PRS01, GBD277PRS02, GBD277PRS03, GBD277PRT00, GBD307PDB09, GBD307PDB10, GBD307PDB2, GBD307PDB3, GBD307PDB4, GBD307PDB5, GBD307PDB6, GBD307PDB7, GBD307PDQ09, GBD307PDQ10, GBD307PDQ2, GBD307PDQ3, GBD307PDQ4, GBD307PDQ5, GBD307PDQ6, GBD307PDQ7, GBD307PDS09, GBD307PDS10, GBD307PDS2, GBD307PDS3, GBD307PDS4, GBD307PDS5, GBD307PDS6, GBD307PDS7, GBD307PDT09, GBD307PDT10, GBD307PDT3, GBD307PDT4, GBD307PDT5, GBD307PDT6, GBD307PDT7, GBD307PRB00, GBD307PRB01, GBD307PRB03, GBD307PRQ00, GBD307PRQ01, GBD307PRS00, GBD307PRS01, GBD307PRS02, GBD307PRT00, GBD307PRY01, KBRP36MHT00, KBRP36MHW00, LTG6234DT5, RBD245PDB10, RBD245PDB11, RBD245PDB12, RBD245PDB14, RBD245PDB15, RBD245PDB7, RBD245PDB8, RBD245PDB9, RBD245PDQ10, RBD245PDQ11, RBD245PDQ12, RBD245PDQ14, RBD245PDQ15, RBD245PDQ7, RBD245PDQ8, RBD245PDQ9, RBD245PDS12, RBD245PDS14, RBD245PDS15, RBD245PDT10, RBD245PDT11, RBD245PDT12, RBD245PDT14, RBD245PDT15, RBD245PDT8, RBD245PDT9, RBD245PRB00, RBD245PRQ00, RBD245PRS00, RBD245PRS01, RBD245PRT00, RBD275PDB10, RBD275PDB11, RBD275PDB12, RBD275PDB13, RBD275PDB14, RBD275PDB15, RBD275PDB7, RBD275PDB8, RBD275PDB9, RBD275PDQ10, RBD275PDQ11, RBD275PDQ12, RBD275PDQ13, RBD275PDQ14, RBD275PDQ15, RBD275PDQ7, RBD275PDQ8, RBD275PDQ9, RBD275PDS12, RBD275PDS14, RBD275PDS15, RBD275PDT10, RBD275PDT11, RBD275PDT12, RBD275PDT13, RBD275PDT14, RBD275PDT15, RBD275PDT8, RBD275PDT9, RBD275PRB00, RBD275PRQ00, RBD275PRS00, RBD275PRS01, RBD275PRT00, RBD276PDB10, RBD276PDB11, RBD276PDB12, RBD276PDB7, RBD276PDB8, RBD276PDB9, RBD276PDQ10, RBD276PDQ11, RBD276PDQ12, RBD276PDQ7, RBD276PDQ8, RBD276PDQ9, RBD277PDB1, RBD277PDB2, RBD277PDB4, RBD277PDQ1, RBD277PDQ2, RBD277PDQ4, RBD305PDB10, RBD305PDB11, RBD305PDB12, RBD305PDB13, RBD305PDB14, RBD305PDB15, RBD305PDB7, RBD305PDB8, RBD305PDB9, RBD305PDQ10, RBD305PDQ11, RBD305PDQ12, RBD305PDQ13, RBD305PDQ14, RBD305PDQ15, RBD305PDQ7, RBD305PDQ8, RBD305PDQ9, RBD305PDS12, RBD305PDS14, RBD305PDS15, RBD305PDT11, RBD305PDT12, RBD305PDT13, RBD305PDT14, RBD305PDT15, RBD305PRB00, RBD305PRQ00, RBD305PRS00, RBD305PRT00, RBD306PDB10, RBD306PDB11, RBD306PDB12, RBD306PDB13, RBD306PDB14, RBD306PDB15, RBD306PDB7, RBD306PDB8, RBD306PDB9, RBD306PDQ10, RBD306PDQ11, RBD306PDQ12, RBD306PDQ13, RBD306PDQ14, RBD306PDQ15, RBD306PDQ7, RBD306PDQ8, RBD306PDQ9, RBD306PDT11, RBD306PDT12, RBD306PDT13, RBD306PDT14, RBD306PDT15, RBD306PDZ10, RBD306PDZ7, RBD306PDZ8, RBD306PDZ9, YGBD307PDQ6, YGBD307PDB7, YGBD307PDQ7

Part Numbers:

4451856, 4451991, 4452890, 4452898, 4453664, 8301345, 8301908, 8301917, 8302319, 8302967, 8303817, 8303883, 4451992, 4452891, 8302966

Whirlpool oven is dead – no display, no beeping. Does the control board need to be repaired?

Young Padawan, here, with another guide from FixYourBoard.com.  We’ve been witnessing some confusion people are having in diagnosing their power supplies for Whirlpool ovens, and whether or not they should send the board in to FixYourBoard.com for repair.  Hopefully this will help clear that up!

To make a good diagnosis, you’ll need to have a voltmeter that can measure AC voltages up to over 120 V.  And please exercise caution when making these measurements – you could shock yourself with high voltage which can kill you! If you’ve cut the breaker to your oven, you’ll need to throw it back on.

Before we begin, there are three quick-checks that ensure you have power getting to your board properly:

1) If the control board makes any kind of beep, then you know your power supply is good.

2) If the display is in anyway illuminated, then your power supply is good.

3) For the third quick-check, stick your voltmeter probes into slots 2 and 3 of the wiring harness that attaches to connector P16 (there should be two blue wires coming into these same slots; see second photo below).  Make sure your probes are making contact with metal – either uninsulated portion of the wire or connector pins inside the harness.  You should measure 24 V AC here.  If not, go on with the rest of the guide.

If your board passes any of the quick-checks but you are still experiencing any of the common problems or some kind of malfunction, then you should send it in to FixYourBoard.com for repair.

Without further ado, the full troubleshooting guide.  Power to the oven control board goes through three stages…

STAGE ONE – power into the board?

120 V AC wall power comes into the board through the P24 wiring connector at pins 1 and 3.  Pin 1 is denoted by the small triangular arrow printed on the actual circuit board.  The space for pin 2 is empty, so when I refer to “pin 3”, it’s actually the second physical pin to occur in this connector.  That can certainly be confusing!  L1 (black wire) comes into pin 3, and Neutral (white wire) comes into pin 1 (see photo below).  The incoming power wires attach to this connector by a wiring harness with a corresponding number of slots.

With a voltmeter, you should measure about 120 V AC by sticking one probe in slot 1 and the other probe in slot 3 (make sure the probes are making contact with the metal wire or pin, not just the insulation around the wire).   If so, scroll down to Stage Two.  If you don’t measure any voltage across these slots, you could have an open thermal fuse (see photo above), which is in series with the incoming black L1 wire.  Keep one probe in slot 1 (Neutral) and move the other to the side of the thermal fuse that is coming from the wall (not the side that goes into the board).  You should measure 120 V AC here.  If you do, then you need to replace the thermal fuse.  If you don’t, then you have an electrical wiring issue in your wall and should contact a professional electrician.

STAGE TWO – power to the transformer?

The circuitry in the control board reroutes power to an off-board transformer.  The power is sent to-and-fro the transformer at connector P16 (see photo below).  First, let’s make sure that 120 V is going to the transformer.  L1 comes out at pin 5 and Neutral comes out at pin 7 (both should be red wires).  Hold your probes in these slots and you should measure 120 V AC across them.  If not, then you definitely have a board problem and should send it in to FixYourBoard.com for repair.

If 120 V AC is coming out of the board, then let’s make sure it’s getting to the transformer.  The wires from the transformer (both wires should be blue) connect at pins 2 and 3 on the P16 connector.  *CUT THE BREAKER TO YOUR OVEN* Some model ovens have the transformer more easily located for removal than others, but we need to be safe before going fishing through all these wires for it.  You should be able to find it by following the blue and red wires coming from the P16 connector.  You may need to pull your oven out from the wall.  Once you have a hold of it, place the transformer somewhere where you can probe it while still being connected to the board, but it’s not being shorted to any other metal or wires.

Being positive that the transformer and wiring is all electrically safe (not shorting to anything), throw the breaker back on.  Hold your voltmeter probes to the two small tabs where the red L1 and neutral wires attach (see photo below) – you should measure about 120 V AC.  It’d be unlikely, but if you don’t measure 120 V AC here and you were getting it out of the board at P16 pins 5 and 7, then the wires or their connections are somehow damaged and need to be replaced or re-soldered.  That kind of damage should be visually apparent.

STAGE 3 – stepped-down power back to the board?

The transformer’s job is to reduce (step-down) the high voltage a lower amount that”s easier and safer for the electronics.  Hold your probes to the two larger tabs on the transformer where the blue wires attach (see photo above).  You should measure 24 V AC here.  If not, then you have a bad transformer.  These are still available and relatively inexpensive.  You can do a Google search of your model number or use a website like RepairClinic.com to find the transformer you need.

If you do measure 24 V AC at the tabs, then ensure it’s getting to the board.  Power from the transformer travels through the blue wires back into the board at connector P16 pins 2 and 3.  Stick your probes in the corresponding slots (where the blue wires come in) on the wiring harness that connects to P16 – you should measure 24 V AC. If you do measure 24 V AC coming out at the transformer, but not back into the board at the P16 connector pins 2 and 3, then it’s again some kind of wiring/connection problem that should be visually apparent.

Reminders:

– In making any measurements with your probes, you need to be sure that you are touching conductive material, like exposed portions of the wires or pins.

– Throughout the course of troubleshooting, you’ve had to throw the breaker a couple times.  It needs to be ON (supplying electricity to the oven) when you check voltages on the board/transformer.

– All measured voltages will be approximate to the nominal values listed throughout the guide.

DANGER HIGH VOLTAGE! Enough said.

That concludes the power supply troubleshooting guide.  I hope you found it helpful!

Cheers,

Young Padawan

 

Model Numbers:

GBD277PDB09, GBD277PDB10, GBD277PDB2, GBD277PDB3, GBD277PDB4, GBD277PDB5, GBD277PDB6, GBD277PDB7, GBD277PDB8, GBD277PDQ09, GBD277PDQ10, GBD277PDQ2, GBD277PDQ3, GBD277PDQ4, GBD277PDQ5, GBD277PDQ6, GBD277PDQ7, GBD277PDQ8, GBD277PDS09, GBD277PDS10, GBD277PDS2, GBD277PDS3, GBD277PDS4, GBD277PDS5, GBD277PDS6, GBD277PDS7, GBD277PDS8, GBD277PDT09, GBD277PDT10, GBD277PDT7, GBD277PDT8, GBD277PRB00, GBD277PRB01, GBD277PRB03, GBD277PRQ00, GBD277PRQ01, GBD277PRQ03, GBD277PRS00, GBD277PRS01, GBD277PRS02, GBD277PRS03, GBD277PRT00, GBD307PDB09, GBD307PDB10, GBD307PDB2, GBD307PDB3, GBD307PDB4, GBD307PDB5, GBD307PDB6, GBD307PDB7, GBD307PDQ09, GBD307PDQ10, GBD307PDQ2, GBD307PDQ3, GBD307PDQ4, GBD307PDQ5, GBD307PDQ6, GBD307PDQ7, GBD307PDS09, GBD307PDS10, GBD307PDS2, GBD307PDS3, GBD307PDS4, GBD307PDS5, GBD307PDS6, GBD307PDS7, GBD307PDT09, GBD307PDT10, GBD307PDT3, GBD307PDT4, GBD307PDT5, GBD307PDT6, GBD307PDT7, GBD307PRB00, GBD307PRB01, GBD307PRB03, GBD307PRQ00, GBD307PRQ01, GBD307PRS00, GBD307PRS01, GBD307PRS02, GBD307PRT00, GBD307PRY01, KBRP36MHT00, KBRP36MHW00, LTG6234DT5, RBD245PDB10, RBD245PDB11, RBD245PDB12, RBD245PDB14, RBD245PDB15, RBD245PDB7, RBD245PDB8, RBD245PDB9, RBD245PDQ10, RBD245PDQ11, RBD245PDQ12, RBD245PDQ14, RBD245PDQ15, RBD245PDQ7, RBD245PDQ8, RBD245PDQ9, RBD245PDS12, RBD245PDS14, RBD245PDS15, RBD245PDT10, RBD245PDT11, RBD245PDT12, RBD245PDT14, RBD245PDT15, RBD245PDT8, RBD245PDT9, RBD245PRB00, RBD245PRQ00, RBD245PRS00, RBD245PRS01, RBD245PRT00, RBD275PDB10, RBD275PDB11, RBD275PDB12, RBD275PDB13, RBD275PDB14, RBD275PDB15, RBD275PDB7, RBD275PDB8, RBD275PDB9, RBD275PDQ10, RBD275PDQ11, RBD275PDQ12, RBD275PDQ13, RBD275PDQ14, RBD275PDQ15, RBD275PDQ7, RBD275PDQ8, RBD275PDQ9, RBD275PDS12, RBD275PDS14, RBD275PDS15, RBD275PDT10, RBD275PDT11, RBD275PDT12, RBD275PDT13, RBD275PDT14, RBD275PDT15, RBD275PDT8, RBD275PDT9, RBD275PRB00, RBD275PRQ00, RBD275PRS00, RBD275PRS01, RBD275PRT00, RBD276PDB10, RBD276PDB11, RBD276PDB12, RBD276PDB7, RBD276PDB8, RBD276PDB9, RBD276PDQ10, RBD276PDQ11, RBD276PDQ12, RBD276PDQ7, RBD276PDQ8, RBD276PDQ9, RBD277PDB1, RBD277PDB2, RBD277PDB4, RBD277PDQ1, RBD277PDQ2, RBD277PDQ4, RBD305PDB10, RBD305PDB11, RBD305PDB12, RBD305PDB13, RBD305PDB14, RBD305PDB15, RBD305PDB7, RBD305PDB8, RBD305PDB9, RBD305PDQ10, RBD305PDQ11, RBD305PDQ12, RBD305PDQ13, RBD305PDQ14, RBD305PDQ15, RBD305PDQ7, RBD305PDQ8, RBD305PDQ9, RBD305PDS12, RBD305PDS14, RBD305PDS15, RBD305PDT11, RBD305PDT12, RBD305PDT13, RBD305PDT14, RBD305PDT15, RBD305PRB00, RBD305PRQ00, RBD305PRS00, RBD305PRT00, RBD306PDB10, RBD306PDB11, RBD306PDB12, RBD306PDB13, RBD306PDB14, RBD306PDB15, RBD306PDB7, RBD306PDB8, RBD306PDB9, RBD306PDQ10, RBD306PDQ11, RBD306PDQ12, RBD306PDQ13, RBD306PDQ14, RBD306PDQ15, RBD306PDQ7, RBD306PDQ8, RBD306PDQ9, RBD306PDT11, RBD306PDT12, RBD306PDT13, RBD306PDT14, RBD306PDT15, RBD306PDZ10, RBD306PDZ7, RBD306PDZ8, RBD306PDZ9, YGBD307PDQ6, YGBD307PDB7, YGBD307PDQ7

Part Numbers:

4451856, 4451991, 4452890, 4452898, 4453664, 8301345, 8301908, 8301917, 8302319, 8302967, 8303817, 8303883, 4451992, 4452891, 8302966

Meaning of F1,F2,F3,F4,F5,F6,F7 codes for Garland/Manitowoc Ovens

Garland oven controllers are programmed to give meaningful information if they enter into a fault condition.  This applies to most Garland ovens such as models: UCO-G-5, ECO-G-10, ECO-G-20, ICO-G-10, ICO-G-20, IC0-E-10 , ICO-E-20, ECO-E-10, ECO-E-20,MP-ES, MP-ED, MP-GS, MP-GD, PaceSetter EC-I-36, EC-II-36, EC-I-42, EC-II-42, GC-I-36,GC-II-36,GC-I-42,GC-II-42, Trendsetter ovens TE3, TE4, TTE3, TTE4, TE3/4-x, TTE3/4-X, TE3/4ECH, TTE3/4ECH, TG2A, TG3,TG4,TTG3,TTG4, Sunfire SDG-1 and SGD-2, TE2A, KFC MCO-G-5K and others.

Many times the result of the F code troubleshooting points to the control board /Timer/ERC.  Don’t worry, they can be rebuilt even if the part is no longer available (NLA) or obsolete.  With www.garland.fixyourboard.com , you will never have to scrap a commercial oven due to failed electronics.

Some part numbers that throw F-codes are: 1517700, 1517701, 1517702, 1517703,1544800, 1517704,1517705, 1517706, 1517710 ,1544801, 1933801, 1933701,4521705,4521282, 4515873, 1025299, 1025204,1034199, 1244705, 1285601, 1025204, 1244704, 1285700, 1905701, 1025204,1244705, 1905601 among others.

Here is a summary of the fault codes and their meaning:

F1Relay Output is Enabled When Not Cooking. The cook relay is closed with no call for heat.
-Control should be rebuilt.

F2 Over Temperature Alarm. The control is sensing an oven temperature 50 degrees or more above the
maximum temperature of 500F
.
-Check the probe wiring and the probes resistance  and replace if faulty
-If probe is functional, rebuild control.

F3Open Probe Circuit. The control is sensing an open circuit at the probe input.

-Check the probe wiring and the probes resistance and replace if faulty.

-If probe is functional, rebuild control.

F4Shorted Probe Circuit. The control is sensing a short circuit at the probe.
-Check the probe wiring and the probes resistance and replace if faulty
-If probe is functional, rebuild control.

F5Relay outputs not enabled when cooking. The control is in cook mode and the heat relay is not closing.
-The control should be rebuilt

F6No 60Hz input. The control does not sense the input power.
-Check the power supply for noise
-If the supply is correct, rebuild control.

F7 EEPROM. The control has detected that the calculated EEPROM check sum is incorrect.

-Reset power to control and if problem persists, rebuild control.

GE Double Built-in Oven – Install Problem After Rebuild. F2 Error and Oven Stays at 100 degrees

So you just got your GE control board refurbished from www.FixYourBoard.com and the controller appears to be doing strange things.  How can this be?  They have a 100% functional test for every outgoing board they rebuild.  Well, there is a good change that there may be an installation wiring problem.  This page describes a common hook up problem that fortunately is easy to correct and causes no permanent damage.  A partial list of model series that this applies to is: 3634842 9114842 JKP44GP JKP44GT JKP44GV JKP45WP JKP45WT JKP45WV JKP54GP JKP54GT JKP54GV JKP55WP JKP55WT JKP55WV JKP56AS JKP56AT JKP56AV ZEK754G ZEK755W ZEK756G ZEK757W.

The solution applies to most built in GE ovens, but the wire coloring may be different for some models.  Make sure you check your wiring diagram that is specific to your model number.

Symptom: F2 errors, oven display stays at 100 degrees, uneven cooking.

Description:  You turn on the upper oven and set the temperature.  The left orange numbers on the display light up and show the set temperature.  After about a minute the left temperature shows 100 degrees and stays there.  You check the upper oven, but it is not getting hot.  The lower oven starts to warm up.  If you set the lower oven, the exact opposite scenario exists.

Cause:

When the upper oven is set, the control board turns on power to the elements and measures the temperature in the upper oven.  The problem is that if the orange wire is connected to DLB2 instead of DLB1  and the yellow is connected to BA2 instead of BA1, the lower oven will begin to heat instead of the upper oven.  In short, the wiring is wrong and needs to match the wiring diagram.  Here is an example that covers most built-in GE ovens:

Upper Bake(BA1) – Yellow                        Lower Bake(BA2) – Yellow/White

Upper Broil(BR1) – Violet                          Lower Broil(BR2) – Violet/White

Upper DLB(DLB1) – Orange                     Lower DLB(DLB2) – Orange/White

A complete list of models is: 3634842594, 9114842593, 9114842594, 9114842993, JKP44GP1, JKP44GP2BG, JKP44GP3BG, JKP44GP4BG, JKP44GT1BB, JKP44GT2BB, JKP44GV1BB, JKP45WP1, JKP45WP2WG, JKP45WP3WG, JKP45WT1WW, JKP45WT2WW, JKP45WV1WW, JKP54GP1BG, JKP54GP2BG, JKP54GP3BG, JKP54GP4BG, JKP54GT1BB, JKP54GT2BB, JKP54GV1BB, JKP55WP1WG, JKP55WP2WG, JKP55WP3WG, JKP55WT1WW, JKP55WT2WW, JKP55WV1WW, JKP56AS1AA, JKP56AT1AA, JKP56AT2AA, JKP56AV1AA, ZEK754GP1, ZEK754GP2BG, ZEK754GP3BG, ZEK754GP4BG, ZEK754GP5BG, ZEK754GP6BG, ZEK754GP7BG, ZEK755WP1, ZEK755WP2WG, ZEK755WP3WG, ZEK755WP4WG, ZEK755WP5WG, ZEK755WP6WG, ZEK756GP2BG, ZEK756GP3BG, ZEK756GP4BG, ZEK756GP5BG, ZEK756GP6BG, ZEK756GP7BG, ZEK757WP1WG, ZEK757WP2WG, ZEK757WP3WG, ZEK757WP4WG, ZEK757WP5WG, ZEK757WP6WG, and more

GE Refrigerator Icing Up?

At www.FixYourBoard.com this is a common question regarding refrigerators; does my control board need to be reconditioned?  How do I isolate the problem to the control board or other parts such as thermistors, defrost heater or defrost over temperature thermostat?  I will try to help here:

This applies to General Electric SxS (Side by Side), Arctica, Profile, Monogram, Bottom-Mount refrigerators.  Model series are ETS22, ESS22, ESS25, GSS20, GSS22, GSS25, GTS22, HTS22, HSS22, HSS25, PTS22, PTS25, STS22, SSS25 and more.  Below is a troubleshooting flow chart from GE documentation.

Make sure the fridge is unplugged before going through this troubleshooting exercise.   A deeper explanation follows the flowchart.

Step – Unplug refrigerator.  Unplug connector J9 from the main board.  Measure between blue wire and connector and orange (neutral) wire on main control board J7 pin 9.  Are there approximately 37 ohms?

Explanation: This step measures the defrost heater.  By unplugging it from the board, you are left with the defrost heater, bi-metal defrost switch and wiring to the control board.  If the resistance is much higher than 37 ohms.  It is the switch, defrost heater or wiring that needs to be replaced.

Step – Verify thermistors are within proper range using thermistor values chart.  Is the resistance within range.

Explanation: Using a D.V.M. (digital volt meter), the thermistors must have a resistance that corresponds to the correct temperature.  This can be a little tricky because you don’t know the actual temperature of the thermistor.  Your values don’t have to be exact, but they should be in the ball park of what you think the temperature is.  Here are three relevant values:

Room temperature (77 degrees F)  – 5,000 ohms

Freezing ( 32 degrees F)                – 16,300 ohms

Evaporator cold ( 23 degrees F)    – 21,000 ohms

Freezer Fan Not Working – GE Refrigerator

This page addresses a common freezer fan problem with GE fridges.  Modern GE fridges use a main electronic control board to control 12V  fans.  A list of models for which this posting applies is shown at the end of this posting.

There are basically 3 reasons that can cause a fan not to work correctly.

1.  Freezer door switch or wiring to the switch is stuck in a position that signals the control board that the freezer door is open.

2.  Fan or wiring to fan has the problem.  There could be a short or open in the fan or wiring to the fan.   Also, the fan could have an obstruction that keeps it from spinning.

3.  Control Board is damaged

Checking the door switches:

For safety, I recommend checking the door switches with the fridge unplugged!!

Backprobe the connectors to perform the following procedure.

With fridge unplugged and the freezer door open, check the resistance between L1 and freezer switch pin 7 on J2 connector.  The resistance should be very low ( less than 10 ohms).  Now, close the door and re-measure the resistance between L1 and freezer switch pin 7.  It should now be open circuit( very high resistance).   If this is working, your freezer door switch is functioning.

Repeat the procedure above for the fresh food door switch.   With the fresh food door open, the resistance between L1 and pin 6 should be less than 10 ohms.  With the fresh food door closed the measurement should be open circuit.

If these door switch tests pass, go to the next step.

Check the Evaporator Fan and Wiring:

Now that you have verified that the door switches are working correctly, the next step is to check if the freezer/evaporator fan is the problem.  We will introduce a trick to force power to the fan and verify whether the problem is in the fan or fan wiring.  Using a paper clip like the one shown below,  we will short pin 8 (12 Volts) and pin 4 (control power to fan)  together on connector J2.

The following shows a picture of the paper clip installed.  Make sure that the paper clip is far enough into the connector that the metal paper clip is making contact with the metal inside the connector.

Now, plug in the fridge.  The freezer fan should stay on continuously.  If the freezer fan is not spinning, make sure that paper clip is pushed in far enough to make connections to the metal inside the connector.  If the fan still doesn’t spin or is spinning at a slow speed, the fan or wiring should be replaced.