Cross-Referencing Oven Control Vocabulary: Control Boards, Clocks, Timers, ERCs, EOCs, Display Boards, Relay Boards, and Touchpads.

 

A valuable vocabulary lesson from a PCB repair company

The point of this blog is to dispel the confusion surrounding the nomenclature of oven control systems.

 

We are talking about the electronic circuit module that is generally mounted behind the control panel, containing the display which shows time and often the status of the oven. More importantly, however, control boards do exactly what their name says – they control all the functions of an oven.  They are also referred to as ERC (Electronic Range Control), EOC (Electronic Oven Control), Controller, Control Module or AssemblyPC(Printed Circuit Board), or PC Card.

Technicians will often refer to these as clocks or timers, since the clock is a prominent feature of oven control boards. And, before electronics were introduced to home appliances, the time was kept by a mechanical clock and the oven was controlled by a separate mechanical system. The clock often failed and needed to be repaired.

Today, oven control boards fail frequently and this company offers better repair service than anybody else! 

There are also many instances of one oven employing two or more control boards that govern different aspects of the oven. For example, there may be one board that contains the display and connects to the keypad, and there will be another board which manages the power of the oven elements and other hardware. In this case, the first board is called the Display Board, Display Head, or Control Head, and the second board is called the Power Relay Board or Appliance Manager.

We always recommend that all boards be sent in for inspection/repair if your oven is having control problems and it contains more than one board.

“How do I know if my oven has more than one board?”

Hopefully you have access to the tech sheet for your unit – sometimes they are taped to the back of the appliance. A tech sheet will contain a wiring diagram which shows all the connections between oven hardware and electronics. It will separate a display board from a power relay board should the appliance have multiple boards.

If you don’t have access to a tech sheet, don’t worry. Another easy way to tell is by identifying whether or not your control board has any relays on it. Relays are electronically controlled switches, and oven control boards generally use them to put high voltage on a heating element, among other things. These components are usually the bulkiest on a control board (aside from a transformer if your board has one). They are often black or white, and their shape is usually rectangular or boxy. They are almost always located right next to the wiring tabs where the colored wires that go to the heating elements, door latch, etc. attach.

If you don’t see anything like this on your control board, then there is an external relay board you haven’t found yet. However, the main control board (which almost always has the display) does control the relay board, and it has to connect to the relay baord to do so. There will be a wiring harness attached to the main control board which has several wires leading to the relay board. Following these wires is the easiest way to locate an external relay board. If you have a double oven with external relay boards, there is likely a relay board for each oven.

Remember, these relay board control high voltage, so if you’re digging around in your oven to find a board, MAKE SURE THE POWER IS OFF.

Lastly, there is the means by which you control your control board – the touchpad (if your control doesn’t have buttons built into the board).  This can also be referred to as the Keypad, Control Panel, Button Panel, or some other similar term.  Often, the touchpad is built into the front panel behind which the control board is mounted.  Sometimes, the touchpad is part of the control assembly.  Regardless, the touchpad and the control board are separate entities.   I’ve never seen a touchpad failure be the result of a control board problem.

What is a touchpad failure? Sometimes the control board will throw an error code: F0, F1, F7, F9, E0F2, E1F1, and  E1F2 are all common touchpad failure codes.  If the board is powered up but pressing buttons yields limited or no response, it’s likely the touchpad has failed.

Seldom can a touchpad be repaired.  The normal solution is to replace the touchpad, which generally means replacing the whole front panel.  There are two types of touchpads: Membrane Switches and Capacitive Glass.

If your panel is glass, you have the latter kind.  This sophisticated design is actually sensitive to the conductance of human skin, which manipulates an electrical field when you hold your finger to the button.  And, there’s actually no button – you just touch the labelled area of the glass to input a command.  Capacitive touchpads contain their own electronic circuit boards which create signals and send them to the main control board for interpretation. These touchpads are really nice, but also quite delicate and expensive to replaced.

Membrane Switches are an older design consisting of a number of contacts arranged in a switching matrix, such that pressing any one button creates a unique short circuit between two of many contacts on a ribbon cable that connects to the control board.  The main control microprocessor interprets each short as a specific function.  Rarely, these can be repaired, but often replacement is the only option.

This company does carry its own line of replacement touchpads for select Whirlpool/KitchenAid Ovens, and is continuously expanding that inventory to more ovens as time goes on.  Yet, we also have the capability to modify your panel with a new touchpad that is functionally equivalent to your original in the event that your membrane switch fails and no replacements are available.

Bottom Line:

You now know the proper name for each aspect of an oven control system, and this company will help you regardless of which part has failed.

‘6700 REV C’ on Jandy/Blue Haven RS4,RS6,RS8 – Remote or Power Center?

This blog has been brought to you by a PCB repair company to help troubleshoot your Jandy/Blue Haven pool system.  Relevant part/model numbers can be found at the bottom of the article.

Is your pool control system unresponsive: doesn’t control pool functions or can’t communicate?  Is the remote displaying error code “6700 REV C”?

If you answered ‘yes’, then you can be sure the communication circuit in your Jandy/Blue Haven pool control system has failed.  The specific failure could be isolated to either the remote (RS4, RS6, or RS8) or the Power Center, or both, or even the wiring between the two.  So which part(s) should you box up and send to a PCB shop for repair?

Unless you have a spare remote known to be problem-free (read more below the photos), there is no good way to make a home diagnosis of which part is causing the communication breakdown.  Fortunately, at this repair company, we have developed a thorough methodology for locating the failure and completely restoring your pool control system.  If you are experiencing pool control issues, send in your Remote and Power Center (images below).   We will quickly identify and repair the failure, and send back your fully function control system backed by a two-year warranty.

suspect in communication failure

RS4 Remote displaying ‘6700 REV C’ error code. (RS6 or RS8 would do same)

suspect in communication failure

Back of Remote: be sure to send the board and panel in for repair.

Suspect in communication failures

Power Center: This will be found on the side of the house near all the pool equipment/machinery.

suspect in communication failure

Back of Power Center: be sure to send the board and panel in for repair.

HOME DIAGNOSIS (If you have a spare remote):

This is only applicable if you have another remote and it hasn’t had this communication problem in the past. Swap the spare remote in for the suspect remote.

If the “6700 REV C” code DOES NOT appear, then you can be sure the REMOTE was causing the problem.  Send it in for repair!

If the “6700 REV C” code DOES appear, then the problem is at least in either the POWER CENTER or WIRING between the power center or remote, but it is possible that the original remote failed, too – we have seen the Power Center and Remote fail simultaneously.  If after going through the following steps, you determine the Power Center is bad, we still highly recommend you send in both the Remote and Power Center.

If you have a Digital Multi Meter (DMM)/Digital Volt Meter (DVM) that can measure electrical resistance, ruling out the wiring is easy.  There is a 4-terminal, red plug on both the Power Center and the Remote.  The cable that attaches between these plugs is how the Remote and Power Center communicate.  Pick one of these plugs and loosen the two center terminals with a flat-head screwdriver .  Pull the two center wires out from the loose terminals and firmly tie the wire ends together.  Now go to the other red plug and hold your meter probes to the two center terminals.  You should measure an electrical resistance of ten ohms (10 Ω) or less.  Any measurement of higher, or infinite/open, resistance means the wiring is corroded, chewed, or not firmly tightened in the plug terminals.  Check the terminals, and if they seem OK, replace the wiring.

If the wiring checks out, then you know the communication problem is being caused by the Power Center.  Send it in for repair!

That wraps it up!  Never hesitate to contact with questions.

PART/MODEL NUMBERS:

6473-E, 6475, 6685, 6686, 6687, 6688, 6689, 6691, 6700, 672, 6727, 6728, 6729, 673, 6886, 6887, 6888, 6889, 6890, 6891, 7074, BH6100, RS4, RS6, RS8

Whirlpool Double Oven (Gold, GBD, RBD series) not heating? Could be an open thermal fuse.

Hello!

Today’s article will help you figure out why the bake/broil elements in your oven(s) aren’t heating up, even though the control panel seems to be operating perfectly.  In fact, you may even have recently received a refurbished/repaired control unit from www.FixYourBoard.com, but the oven still won’t heat up.  Fear no longer – this blog will get you on the right track in no time.

This guide is for troubleshooting Whirlpool double ovens – please refer to the list of relevant part and model numbers at the bottom of this blog to ensure you are in the right place.

First off, does your control panel seem to be functional? If the display isn’t illuminated, and there are no beeps when you press buttons, but you’re positive you’ve properly hooked up the control board and have the breaker on, then you may have an issue with the power supply to the control board.  Please refer to this guide for troubleshooting the power supply.

So everything seems to be properly connected.   You set the oven to bake, the display shows that the heat is on (the door needs to be closed), but the oven elements aren’t heating up at all, and the control is not throwing any error codes.  This is almost certainly being cause by an open “oven shutdown thermal fuse”.  There is one of these fuses for both the lower oven and the upper oven, each.  Hopefully, you’re only having this problem in one of the two, but it wouldn’t be too surprising if both thermal fuses went out, and it’s not hard to replace them.   Now, if the elements do heat up, even if it’s just a little bit, then the problem is either with the oven (temperature) sensor or the oven control board – please refer to this blog for troubleshooting that issue.

 

CUT THE BREAKER!!! These next steps involve measuring circuit elements that run at HIGH VOLTAGE WHICH CAN KILL YOU when the breaker is on.

You’ll want to have a DMM or DVM (Digital Multi/Voltage Meter) that can measure electrical resistance.  There is a large variety of inexpensive meters available.  Below are two different kinds of meters – both are set to check for electrical resistance of up to 200 ohms (Ω).  Set your meter to the 200 Ω scale, and make sure the probes are connected to the common (black) and voltage (red) ports.

Typical Digital Multi-Meter (DMM) set to the 200 Ω scale.

Typical Digital Multi-Meter (DMM) set to the 200 Ω scale.

First, let’s make sure the actual heating elements are not the problem.  You need to have the control board exposed, but still hooked up to the oven, and THE BREAKER SHOULD BE OFF. Near the element relays are the wiring tabs where the heating elements connect to the control board.  The upper oven elements are fed by the set of tabs labeled P18.  There should be two black wires on the two center tabs, and a red wire and an orange wire which connect to the outside tabs.  Stick your probes into the sockets where the orange and red wires connect to the board – you should be in the ballpark of 50 Ω.  The lower oven is fed by the other set of tabs, labeled P26.  Here, we want to stick the probes into the sockets occupied by the red (outside) and orange (center) wires – should also be around 50 Ω.   If these measurements check out, skip the rest of this paragraph.  If either one of these measurements are significantly far from 50 Ω (e.g. <35 Ω or >65 Ω) , or especially if the meter over-ranges (usually meters display a “1” on the far right of the screen when they over-range), then you need to individually inspect the element(s) in question.  Oven models are unique so I can’t give specific information on how to extract the heating elements from the oven cavity – you may want to have a technician do this with you – but it’s usually just a matter of removing some mounting screws, and you may have to get behind the oven to disconnect the wiring.  The heating elements are essentially long metal rods bent into a radiator-like shape (they’re basically radiators, after all).  The resistance from end-to-end of a broil (top) element should be about 20 Ω, and it should be about 30 Ω for a bake (bottom) element.  If any of these elements fail to meet approximate spec, they should probably be replaced – contact a technician.  If the elements are fine, but the measurements on the control board were bad, then it’s a wiring/connection issue.

So the elements aren’t the problem, but the thermal fuses could still definitely be bad – let’s see.  For these ovens, there are two different styles of control boards, which we’ll refer to as 2319 and 2697.  The easy way to tell which one you have is by looking at the right side of the back of the board: if it has two DLB (Double Line Break; photos below) relays, then it is a 2319, otherwise it’s a 2967.  Go to the appropriate paragraph.

Whirlpool Double Oven Control Board 8302967 – no DLB relays.

Whirlpool Double Oven Control Board 8302319 – has DLB relays.

Often, Whirlpool Control Board 8302319 is in a Plastic Case.

Troubleshooting 2319

Your board has the DLB relays.   Let’s check the upper oven thermal fuse first.  The upper oven DLB relay should have two solid red wires connected to it, and we need to figure out which one to use for the fuse test.  First, with your meter set to the 200 Ω scale, hold a probe to each of the contacts for the red wires – it should over-range, meaning that it is an open circuit (if your meter registers any resistance within the 200 Ω scale, then the relay is stuck and you need to send the board to www.FixYourBoard.com to be repaired).  Now, look at the other (lower oven) DLB relay.  This one should have one solid red wire, and one red wire with a white stripe.  The solid red wire on the lower oven DLB relay should be in closed circuit to one of the solid red wires on the upper oven DLB relay, and it should be open circuit to the other solid red wire.  Use your meter to find out which one – the meter should register a value (somewhere around 20-30 Ω) for the closed circuit, and it should over-range for the open circuit.  We want to use the solid red wire on the upper oven DLB that is open circuit to the solid red wire on the lower oven DLB.  Hold one of the probes to the contact for that solid red wire, and stick the other probe into either the orange or red wire socket connected to the P18 tabs.  This should be a closed circuit.  If it is an open circuit, the upper oven thermal fuse is open and needs to be replaced – take a note of that for now.

Now let’s look at the lower oven thermal fuse.  Hold one of your probes to the contact for the red wire with a white stripe that connects to the lower oven DLB relay.  Stick the other probe into the orange wire socket connected to the P26 tabs.  This should be a closed circuit.  If it is an open circuit, the upper oven thermal fuse is open and needs to be replaced.  Skip the 2967 troubleshooting paragraph to see about replacing these fuses.

Troubleshooting 2967

Your board does not have the DLB relays.  With your meter set to the 200 Ω scale, stick one of the probes into the socket for either the red or the orange wire that connects to the P18 tabs on the board.  Stick the other probe into the socket for the orange wire that connects to the P26 tabs.  In normal conditions, this should be a closed circuit – the meter should read a value around 40-60 Ω.  If the meter over-ranges, then either one or both of the thermal fuses are open.

Bad Thermal Fuse

The meter has told us one or both of the thermal fuses are bad.  These are mounted on the rear panel(s) of the oven(s), so you’re going to have to pull the double oven out from the kitchen wall to access them.  Open up the rear panel(s) of the oven(s) (some hardware will probably required), and you should find the thermal fuses mounted on the panel.  A red wire and an orange wire should be connected to one side of the fuse, while just one red wire is connected to the other side of the fuse.  This will be true of both the upper and lower thermal fuses, with one exception: if your oven is not self-cleaning, the lower thermal fuse will only have one orange wire on one side and one red wire on the other.  Disconnect the wiring and unmount the suspect fuse(s).  Use your meter to verify that the fuse(s) is/are open – holding one probe to each of the contacts should result in over-ranging in the 200 Ω scale if the fuse is open.  Contact a local appliance parts supplier or a site like www.RepairClinic.com to find the necessary replacement according to the part number and/or color markings on the fuse…

Color Markings___________Whirlpool Part Number

Pink/White Stripe__________4452223

Yellow/White Stripe________4451442

Red ____________________4450934

Orange/White Stripe________4450334

Blue____________________4450250

Green/White Stripe_________4450249

Blue/White Stripe__________8300802

Well that wraps it up! Hope all goes well in the kitchen, and always feel free to contact www.FixYourBoard.com for inquiries into control board repair/maintenance.

-Young Padawan

Model Numbers:

GBD277PDB09, GBD277PDB10, GBD277PDB2, GBD277PDB3, GBD277PDB4, GBD277PDB5, GBD277PDB6, GBD277PDB7, GBD277PDB8, GBD277PDQ09, GBD277PDQ10, GBD277PDQ2, GBD277PDQ3, GBD277PDQ4, GBD277PDQ5, GBD277PDQ6, GBD277PDQ7, GBD277PDQ8, GBD277PDS09, GBD277PDS10, GBD277PDS2, GBD277PDS3, GBD277PDS4, GBD277PDS5, GBD277PDS6, GBD277PDS7, GBD277PDS8, GBD277PDT09, GBD277PDT10, GBD277PDT7, GBD277PDT8, GBD277PRB00, GBD277PRB01, GBD277PRB03, GBD277PRQ00, GBD277PRQ01, GBD277PRQ03, GBD277PRS00, GBD277PRS01, GBD277PRS02, GBD277PRS03, GBD277PRT00, GBD307PDB09, GBD307PDB10, GBD307PDB2, GBD307PDB3, GBD307PDB4, GBD307PDB5, GBD307PDB6, GBD307PDB7, GBD307PDQ09, GBD307PDQ10, GBD307PDQ2, GBD307PDQ3, GBD307PDQ4, GBD307PDQ5, GBD307PDQ6, GBD307PDQ7, GBD307PDS09, GBD307PDS10, GBD307PDS2, GBD307PDS3, GBD307PDS4, GBD307PDS5, GBD307PDS6, GBD307PDS7, GBD307PDT09, GBD307PDT10, GBD307PDT3, GBD307PDT4, GBD307PDT5, GBD307PDT6, GBD307PDT7, GBD307PRB00, GBD307PRB01, GBD307PRB03, GBD307PRQ00, GBD307PRQ01, GBD307PRS00, GBD307PRS01, GBD307PRS02, GBD307PRT00, GBD307PRY01, KBRP36MHT00, KBRP36MHW00, LTG6234DT5, RBD245PDB10, RBD245PDB11, RBD245PDB12, RBD245PDB14, RBD245PDB15, RBD245PDB7, RBD245PDB8, RBD245PDB9, RBD245PDQ10, RBD245PDQ11, RBD245PDQ12, RBD245PDQ14, RBD245PDQ15, RBD245PDQ7, RBD245PDQ8, RBD245PDQ9, RBD245PDS12, RBD245PDS14, RBD245PDS15, RBD245PDT10, RBD245PDT11, RBD245PDT12, RBD245PDT14, RBD245PDT15, RBD245PDT8, RBD245PDT9, RBD245PRB00, RBD245PRQ00, RBD245PRS00, RBD245PRS01, RBD245PRT00, RBD275PDB10, RBD275PDB11, RBD275PDB12, RBD275PDB13, RBD275PDB14, RBD275PDB15, RBD275PDB7, RBD275PDB8, RBD275PDB9, RBD275PDQ10, RBD275PDQ11, RBD275PDQ12, RBD275PDQ13, RBD275PDQ14, RBD275PDQ15, RBD275PDQ7, RBD275PDQ8, RBD275PDQ9, RBD275PDS12, RBD275PDS14, RBD275PDS15, RBD275PDT10, RBD275PDT11, RBD275PDT12, RBD275PDT13, RBD275PDT14, RBD275PDT15, RBD275PDT8, RBD275PDT9, RBD275PRB00, RBD275PRQ00, RBD275PRS00, RBD275PRS01, RBD275PRT00, RBD276PDB10, RBD276PDB11, RBD276PDB12, RBD276PDB7, RBD276PDB8, RBD276PDB9, RBD276PDQ10, RBD276PDQ11, RBD276PDQ12, RBD276PDQ7, RBD276PDQ8, RBD276PDQ9, RBD277PDB1, RBD277PDB2, RBD277PDB4, RBD277PDQ1, RBD277PDQ2, RBD277PDQ4, RBD305PDB10, RBD305PDB11, RBD305PDB12, RBD305PDB13, RBD305PDB14, RBD305PDB15, RBD305PDB7, RBD305PDB8, RBD305PDB9, RBD305PDQ10, RBD305PDQ11, RBD305PDQ12, RBD305PDQ13, RBD305PDQ14, RBD305PDQ15, RBD305PDQ7, RBD305PDQ8, RBD305PDQ9, RBD305PDS12, RBD305PDS14, RBD305PDS15, RBD305PDT11, RBD305PDT12, RBD305PDT13, RBD305PDT14, RBD305PDT15, RBD305PRB00, RBD305PRQ00, RBD305PRS00, RBD305PRT00, RBD306PDB10, RBD306PDB11, RBD306PDB12, RBD306PDB13, RBD306PDB14, RBD306PDB15, RBD306PDB7, RBD306PDB8, RBD306PDB9, RBD306PDQ10, RBD306PDQ11, RBD306PDQ12, RBD306PDQ13, RBD306PDQ14, RBD306PDQ15, RBD306PDQ7, RBD306PDQ8, RBD306PDQ9, RBD306PDT11, RBD306PDT12, RBD306PDT13, RBD306PDT14, RBD306PDT15, RBD306PDZ10, RBD306PDZ7, RBD306PDZ8, RBD306PDZ9, YGBD307PDQ6, YGBD307PDB7, YGBD307PDQ7

Part Numbers:

4451856, 4451991, 4452890, 4452898, 4453664, 8301345, 8301908, 8301917, 8302319, 8302967, 8303817, 8303883, 4451992, 4452891, 8302966

Dead GE double oven? Transformer or Controller? Troubleshooting Guide

This guide will help you identify what problems you may have in the power supply to the electronics in your GE double oven.  Some symptoms you may be experiencing include, but are not limited to:
  • Blank display or no beeping
  • F1 error code
  • Oven seems dead

Generally, these are signs of a failed controller, but sometimes blank display or dead oven are simply the result of a failed transformer.  I say “simply” because it is much less expensive and much easier to replace/fix the transformer than it is the controller.  The objective of this post is to help you figure out which is the faulty part so you can send the right one to www.FixYourBoard.com to be repaired.

You’ll need an AC voltmeter as well as a basic tool set handy (pretty much just the right sized screwdriver).

The first thing to do is cut the breaker to your oven before you start taking it apart – we don’t want anybody getting killed by high voltage.

Next, you’ll need to expose your controller.  Refer to this post for help if you don’t know how to access the control unit.  There is no need to disconnect anything – that could actually make your measurements useless.  Once it’s exposed, make sure you can comfortably touch the various wiring harnesses with the voltmeter probes.  If it’s going to be a struggle, you may want to demount the unit from the panel to get some more slack.

Now, turn the breaker back on.  You’ll need to be very careful from here on.  Even though the controller is mostly a low voltage device, there are still points of high voltage on the relay board, and you can still cause electrical damage if you probe the wrong places.  Wall power goes into a transformer somewhere off the control module, and the transformer steps the wall power down to low voltage and routes that to the control board.  The low voltage comes into the board at the white wiring connector labeled J1.  It’s near the black connector receiving the clear, thin ribbon cable from the keypad (see photo).

The transformer sends two separate low voltages to the control board, 21.5 VAC and 4.6 VAC.  These voltages are approximate: as long is you’re in the ballpark, you should be good.  Also, it’s important to note that there are many variations of this control module.  Yours may look a bit different from the one depicted below, but you should still be getting the same supply from the transformer.  The photo shows a unit with all the wiring detached – yours should have a wiring harness occupying the J1 connector, but you should be able to stick the voltmeter probes along the wires into the sockets of the harness to take measurements.  If not, cut the breaker, disconnect the harness from J1 connector, turn the breaker back on, and probe the bottom side of the harness.  You should measure voltages according the photo.  Note that the empty slot is referred to as pins 3.

GE double oven electronic control board

Probes on pins 1 and 2 is one measurement. Probes on pins 4 and 5 is a separate measurement. The empty slot is referred to as Pin 3.

If you measure the proper voltages, then you know the transformer is not the issue.  Make sure the wiring harness is well connected, clean, and making good contact.  If you’re still having problems as described at the beginning, then the controller is the problem, and you should send it to FixYourBoard.com for repair.

If you aren’t reading these voltages, then you either have a bad transformer, or bad wiring.  Cut the breaker, and follow the wires back to the transformer.  These four wires come out of the secondary side of the transformer.  There should be another two wires going into the other side of the transformer, the primary side.  With the breaker on, you should measure 120VAC going into the primary.  I shouldn’t need to tell you how DANGEROUS 120VAC is.  If you measure 120VAC at the primary, check to see if you get 21.5 and 4.6 right at the secondary.  If not for either one, then the transformer is definitely bad and you should contact FixYourBoard.com for repair.  If you have these voltages right at the transformer, but not at the board, then the wiring has broken down somewhere between and needs to be fixed.  If you’re not getting 120VAC into the transformer primary, then you have a serious electrical wiring problem in your wall which should be addressed by a professional (e.g. electrician).

I hope you found this guide helpful! Remember you can always email info@fixyourboard.com with questions.

-Young Padawan

Whirlpool oven is dead – no display, no beeping. Does the control board need to be repaired?

Young Padawan, here, with another guide from FixYourBoard.com.  We’ve been witnessing some confusion people are having in diagnosing their power supplies for Whirlpool ovens, and whether or not they should send the board in to FixYourBoard.com for repair.  Hopefully this will help clear that up!

To make a good diagnosis, you’ll need to have a voltmeter that can measure AC voltages up to over 120 V.  And please exercise caution when making these measurements – you could shock yourself with high voltage which can kill you! If you’ve cut the breaker to your oven, you’ll need to throw it back on.

Before we begin, there are three quick-checks that ensure you have power getting to your board properly:

1) If the control board makes any kind of beep, then you know your power supply is good.

2) If the display is in anyway illuminated, then your power supply is good.

3) For the third quick-check, stick your voltmeter probes into slots 2 and 3 of the wiring harness that attaches to connector P16 (there should be two blue wires coming into these same slots; see second photo below).  Make sure your probes are making contact with metal – either uninsulated portion of the wire or connector pins inside the harness.  You should measure 24 V AC here.  If not, go on with the rest of the guide.

If your board passes any of the quick-checks but you are still experiencing any of the common problems or some kind of malfunction, then you should send it in to FixYourBoard.com for repair.

Without further ado, the full troubleshooting guide.  Power to the oven control board goes through three stages…

STAGE ONE – power into the board?

120 V AC wall power comes into the board through the P24 wiring connector at pins 1 and 3.  Pin 1 is denoted by the small triangular arrow printed on the actual circuit board.  The space for pin 2 is empty, so when I refer to “pin 3”, it’s actually the second physical pin to occur in this connector.  That can certainly be confusing!  L1 (black wire) comes into pin 3, and Neutral (white wire) comes into pin 1 (see photo below).  The incoming power wires attach to this connector by a wiring harness with a corresponding number of slots.

With a voltmeter, you should measure about 120 V AC by sticking one probe in slot 1 and the other probe in slot 3 (make sure the probes are making contact with the metal wire or pin, not just the insulation around the wire).   If so, scroll down to Stage Two.  If you don’t measure any voltage across these slots, you could have an open thermal fuse (see photo above), which is in series with the incoming black L1 wire.  Keep one probe in slot 1 (Neutral) and move the other to the side of the thermal fuse that is coming from the wall (not the side that goes into the board).  You should measure 120 V AC here.  If you do, then you need to replace the thermal fuse.  If you don’t, then you have an electrical wiring issue in your wall and should contact a professional electrician.

STAGE TWO – power to the transformer?

The circuitry in the control board reroutes power to an off-board transformer.  The power is sent to-and-fro the transformer at connector P16 (see photo below).  First, let’s make sure that 120 V is going to the transformer.  L1 comes out at pin 5 and Neutral comes out at pin 7 (both should be red wires).  Hold your probes in these slots and you should measure 120 V AC across them.  If not, then you definitely have a board problem and should send it in to FixYourBoard.com for repair.

If 120 V AC is coming out of the board, then let’s make sure it’s getting to the transformer.  The wires from the transformer (both wires should be blue) connect at pins 2 and 3 on the P16 connector.  *CUT THE BREAKER TO YOUR OVEN* Some model ovens have the transformer more easily located for removal than others, but we need to be safe before going fishing through all these wires for it.  You should be able to find it by following the blue and red wires coming from the P16 connector.  You may need to pull your oven out from the wall.  Once you have a hold of it, place the transformer somewhere where you can probe it while still being connected to the board, but it’s not being shorted to any other metal or wires.

Being positive that the transformer and wiring is all electrically safe (not shorting to anything), throw the breaker back on.  Hold your voltmeter probes to the two small tabs where the red L1 and neutral wires attach (see photo below) – you should measure about 120 V AC.  It’d be unlikely, but if you don’t measure 120 V AC here and you were getting it out of the board at P16 pins 5 and 7, then the wires or their connections are somehow damaged and need to be replaced or re-soldered.  That kind of damage should be visually apparent.

STAGE 3 – stepped-down power back to the board?

The transformer’s job is to reduce (step-down) the high voltage a lower amount that”s easier and safer for the electronics.  Hold your probes to the two larger tabs on the transformer where the blue wires attach (see photo above).  You should measure 24 V AC here.  If not, then you have a bad transformer.  These are still available and relatively inexpensive.  You can do a Google search of your model number or use a website like RepairClinic.com to find the transformer you need.

If you do measure 24 V AC at the tabs, then ensure it’s getting to the board.  Power from the transformer travels through the blue wires back into the board at connector P16 pins 2 and 3.  Stick your probes in the corresponding slots (where the blue wires come in) on the wiring harness that connects to P16 – you should measure 24 V AC. If you do measure 24 V AC coming out at the transformer, but not back into the board at the P16 connector pins 2 and 3, then it’s again some kind of wiring/connection problem that should be visually apparent.

Reminders:

– In making any measurements with your probes, you need to be sure that you are touching conductive material, like exposed portions of the wires or pins.

– Throughout the course of troubleshooting, you’ve had to throw the breaker a couple times.  It needs to be ON (supplying electricity to the oven) when you check voltages on the board/transformer.

– All measured voltages will be approximate to the nominal values listed throughout the guide.

DANGER HIGH VOLTAGE! Enough said.

That concludes the power supply troubleshooting guide.  I hope you found it helpful!

Cheers,

Young Padawan

 

Model Numbers:

GBD277PDB09, GBD277PDB10, GBD277PDB2, GBD277PDB3, GBD277PDB4, GBD277PDB5, GBD277PDB6, GBD277PDB7, GBD277PDB8, GBD277PDQ09, GBD277PDQ10, GBD277PDQ2, GBD277PDQ3, GBD277PDQ4, GBD277PDQ5, GBD277PDQ6, GBD277PDQ7, GBD277PDQ8, GBD277PDS09, GBD277PDS10, GBD277PDS2, GBD277PDS3, GBD277PDS4, GBD277PDS5, GBD277PDS6, GBD277PDS7, GBD277PDS8, GBD277PDT09, GBD277PDT10, GBD277PDT7, GBD277PDT8, GBD277PRB00, GBD277PRB01, GBD277PRB03, GBD277PRQ00, GBD277PRQ01, GBD277PRQ03, GBD277PRS00, GBD277PRS01, GBD277PRS02, GBD277PRS03, GBD277PRT00, GBD307PDB09, GBD307PDB10, GBD307PDB2, GBD307PDB3, GBD307PDB4, GBD307PDB5, GBD307PDB6, GBD307PDB7, GBD307PDQ09, GBD307PDQ10, GBD307PDQ2, GBD307PDQ3, GBD307PDQ4, GBD307PDQ5, GBD307PDQ6, GBD307PDQ7, GBD307PDS09, GBD307PDS10, GBD307PDS2, GBD307PDS3, GBD307PDS4, GBD307PDS5, GBD307PDS6, GBD307PDS7, GBD307PDT09, GBD307PDT10, GBD307PDT3, GBD307PDT4, GBD307PDT5, GBD307PDT6, GBD307PDT7, GBD307PRB00, GBD307PRB01, GBD307PRB03, GBD307PRQ00, GBD307PRQ01, GBD307PRS00, GBD307PRS01, GBD307PRS02, GBD307PRT00, GBD307PRY01, KBRP36MHT00, KBRP36MHW00, LTG6234DT5, RBD245PDB10, RBD245PDB11, RBD245PDB12, RBD245PDB14, RBD245PDB15, RBD245PDB7, RBD245PDB8, RBD245PDB9, RBD245PDQ10, RBD245PDQ11, RBD245PDQ12, RBD245PDQ14, RBD245PDQ15, RBD245PDQ7, RBD245PDQ8, RBD245PDQ9, RBD245PDS12, RBD245PDS14, RBD245PDS15, RBD245PDT10, RBD245PDT11, RBD245PDT12, RBD245PDT14, RBD245PDT15, RBD245PDT8, RBD245PDT9, RBD245PRB00, RBD245PRQ00, RBD245PRS00, RBD245PRS01, RBD245PRT00, RBD275PDB10, RBD275PDB11, RBD275PDB12, RBD275PDB13, RBD275PDB14, RBD275PDB15, RBD275PDB7, RBD275PDB8, RBD275PDB9, RBD275PDQ10, RBD275PDQ11, RBD275PDQ12, RBD275PDQ13, RBD275PDQ14, RBD275PDQ15, RBD275PDQ7, RBD275PDQ8, RBD275PDQ9, RBD275PDS12, RBD275PDS14, RBD275PDS15, RBD275PDT10, RBD275PDT11, RBD275PDT12, RBD275PDT13, RBD275PDT14, RBD275PDT15, RBD275PDT8, RBD275PDT9, RBD275PRB00, RBD275PRQ00, RBD275PRS00, RBD275PRS01, RBD275PRT00, RBD276PDB10, RBD276PDB11, RBD276PDB12, RBD276PDB7, RBD276PDB8, RBD276PDB9, RBD276PDQ10, RBD276PDQ11, RBD276PDQ12, RBD276PDQ7, RBD276PDQ8, RBD276PDQ9, RBD277PDB1, RBD277PDB2, RBD277PDB4, RBD277PDQ1, RBD277PDQ2, RBD277PDQ4, RBD305PDB10, RBD305PDB11, RBD305PDB12, RBD305PDB13, RBD305PDB14, RBD305PDB15, RBD305PDB7, RBD305PDB8, RBD305PDB9, RBD305PDQ10, RBD305PDQ11, RBD305PDQ12, RBD305PDQ13, RBD305PDQ14, RBD305PDQ15, RBD305PDQ7, RBD305PDQ8, RBD305PDQ9, RBD305PDS12, RBD305PDS14, RBD305PDS15, RBD305PDT11, RBD305PDT12, RBD305PDT13, RBD305PDT14, RBD305PDT15, RBD305PRB00, RBD305PRQ00, RBD305PRS00, RBD305PRT00, RBD306PDB10, RBD306PDB11, RBD306PDB12, RBD306PDB13, RBD306PDB14, RBD306PDB15, RBD306PDB7, RBD306PDB8, RBD306PDB9, RBD306PDQ10, RBD306PDQ11, RBD306PDQ12, RBD306PDQ13, RBD306PDQ14, RBD306PDQ15, RBD306PDQ7, RBD306PDQ8, RBD306PDQ9, RBD306PDT11, RBD306PDT12, RBD306PDT13, RBD306PDT14, RBD306PDT15, RBD306PDZ10, RBD306PDZ7, RBD306PDZ8, RBD306PDZ9, YGBD307PDQ6, YGBD307PDB7, YGBD307PDQ7

Part Numbers:

4451856, 4451991, 4452890, 4452898, 4453664, 8301345, 8301908, 8301917, 8302319, 8302967, 8303817, 8303883, 4451992, 4452891, 8302966

Meaning of F1,F2,F3,F4,F5,F6,F7 codes for Garland/Manitowoc Ovens

Garland oven controllers are programmed to give meaningful information if they enter into a fault condition.  This applies to most Garland ovens such as models: UCO-G-5, ECO-G-10, ECO-G-20, ICO-G-10, ICO-G-20, IC0-E-10 , ICO-E-20, ECO-E-10, ECO-E-20,MP-ES, MP-ED, MP-GS, MP-GD, PaceSetter EC-I-36, EC-II-36, EC-I-42, EC-II-42, GC-I-36,GC-II-36,GC-I-42,GC-II-42, Trendsetter ovens TE3, TE4, TTE3, TTE4, TE3/4-x, TTE3/4-X, TE3/4ECH, TTE3/4ECH, TG2A, TG3,TG4,TTG3,TTG4, Sunfire SDG-1 and SGD-2, TE2A, KFC MCO-G-5K and others.

Many times the result of the F code troubleshooting points to the control board /Timer/ERC.  Don’t worry, they can be rebuilt even if the part is no longer available (NLA) or obsolete.  With www.garland.fixyourboard.com , you will never have to scrap a commercial oven due to failed electronics.

Some part numbers that throw F-codes are: 1517700, 1517701, 1517702, 1517703,1544800, 1517704,1517705, 1517706, 1517710 ,1544801, 1933801, 1933701,4521705,4521282, 4515873, 1025299, 1025204,1034199, 1244705, 1285601, 1025204, 1244704, 1285700, 1905701, 1025204,1244705, 1905601 among others.

Here is a summary of the fault codes and their meaning:

F1Relay Output is Enabled When Not Cooking. The cook relay is closed with no call for heat.
-Control should be rebuilt.

F2 Over Temperature Alarm. The control is sensing an oven temperature 50 degrees or more above the
maximum temperature of 500F
.
-Check the probe wiring and the probes resistance  and replace if faulty
-If probe is functional, rebuild control.

F3Open Probe Circuit. The control is sensing an open circuit at the probe input.

-Check the probe wiring and the probes resistance and replace if faulty.

-If probe is functional, rebuild control.

F4Shorted Probe Circuit. The control is sensing a short circuit at the probe.
-Check the probe wiring and the probes resistance and replace if faulty
-If probe is functional, rebuild control.

F5Relay outputs not enabled when cooking. The control is in cook mode and the heat relay is not closing.
-The control should be rebuilt

F6No 60Hz input. The control does not sense the input power.
-Check the power supply for noise
-If the supply is correct, rebuild control.

F7 EEPROM. The control has detected that the calculated EEPROM check sum is incorrect.

-Reset power to control and if problem persists, rebuild control.