Cross-Referencing Oven Control Vocabulary: Control Boards, Clocks, Timers, ERCs, EOCs, Display Boards, Relay Boards, and Touchpads.

 

A valuable vocabulary lesson from a PCB repair company

The point of this blog is to dispel the confusion surrounding the nomenclature of oven control systems.

 

We are talking about the electronic circuit module that is generally mounted behind the control panel, containing the display which shows time and often the status of the oven. More importantly, however, control boards do exactly what their name says – they control all the functions of an oven.  They are also referred to as ERC (Electronic Range Control), EOC (Electronic Oven Control), Controller, Control Module or AssemblyPC(Printed Circuit Board), or PC Card.

Technicians will often refer to these as clocks or timers, since the clock is a prominent feature of oven control boards. And, before electronics were introduced to home appliances, the time was kept by a mechanical clock and the oven was controlled by a separate mechanical system. The clock often failed and needed to be repaired.

Today, oven control boards fail frequently and this company offers better repair service than anybody else! 

There are also many instances of one oven employing two or more control boards that govern different aspects of the oven. For example, there may be one board that contains the display and connects to the keypad, and there will be another board which manages the power of the oven elements and other hardware. In this case, the first board is called the Display Board, Display Head, or Control Head, and the second board is called the Power Relay Board or Appliance Manager.

We always recommend that all boards be sent in for inspection/repair if your oven is having control problems and it contains more than one board.

“How do I know if my oven has more than one board?”

Hopefully you have access to the tech sheet for your unit – sometimes they are taped to the back of the appliance. A tech sheet will contain a wiring diagram which shows all the connections between oven hardware and electronics. It will separate a display board from a power relay board should the appliance have multiple boards.

If you don’t have access to a tech sheet, don’t worry. Another easy way to tell is by identifying whether or not your control board has any relays on it. Relays are electronically controlled switches, and oven control boards generally use them to put high voltage on a heating element, among other things. These components are usually the bulkiest on a control board (aside from a transformer if your board has one). They are often black or white, and their shape is usually rectangular or boxy. They are almost always located right next to the wiring tabs where the colored wires that go to the heating elements, door latch, etc. attach.

If you don’t see anything like this on your control board, then there is an external relay board you haven’t found yet. However, the main control board (which almost always has the display) does control the relay board, and it has to connect to the relay baord to do so. There will be a wiring harness attached to the main control board which has several wires leading to the relay board. Following these wires is the easiest way to locate an external relay board. If you have a double oven with external relay boards, there is likely a relay board for each oven.

Remember, these relay board control high voltage, so if you’re digging around in your oven to find a board, MAKE SURE THE POWER IS OFF.

Lastly, there is the means by which you control your control board – the touchpad (if your control doesn’t have buttons built into the board).  This can also be referred to as the Keypad, Control Panel, Button Panel, or some other similar term.  Often, the touchpad is built into the front panel behind which the control board is mounted.  Sometimes, the touchpad is part of the control assembly.  Regardless, the touchpad and the control board are separate entities.   I’ve never seen a touchpad failure be the result of a control board problem.

What is a touchpad failure? Sometimes the control board will throw an error code: F0, F1, F7, F9, E0F2, E1F1, and  E1F2 are all common touchpad failure codes.  If the board is powered up but pressing buttons yields limited or no response, it’s likely the touchpad has failed.

Seldom can a touchpad be repaired.  The normal solution is to replace the touchpad, which generally means replacing the whole front panel.  There are two types of touchpads: Membrane Switches and Capacitive Glass.

If your panel is glass, you have the latter kind.  This sophisticated design is actually sensitive to the conductance of human skin, which manipulates an electrical field when you hold your finger to the button.  And, there’s actually no button – you just touch the labelled area of the glass to input a command.  Capacitive touchpads contain their own electronic circuit boards which create signals and send them to the main control board for interpretation. These touchpads are really nice, but also quite delicate and expensive to replaced.

Membrane Switches are an older design consisting of a number of contacts arranged in a switching matrix, such that pressing any one button creates a unique short circuit between two of many contacts on a ribbon cable that connects to the control board.  The main control microprocessor interprets each short as a specific function.  Rarely, these can be repaired, but often replacement is the only option.

This company does carry its own line of replacement touchpads for select Whirlpool/KitchenAid Ovens, and is continuously expanding that inventory to more ovens as time goes on.  Yet, we also have the capability to modify your panel with a new touchpad that is functionally equivalent to your original in the event that your membrane switch fails and no replacements are available.

Bottom Line:

You now know the proper name for each aspect of an oven control system, and this company will help you regardless of which part has failed.

Jenn-Air ACB, JEW, JJW, MEW, SCE, SVD, and WW Series Built-In Ovens can’t keep time and can’t be calibrated? Solution is here.

We’ve seen a number of Jenn-Air ovens (relevant model/part numbers and photos of typical boards below) here at FixYourBoard.com with the same recurring problem…

The oven control seems unable to consistently keep the time (e.g. the display is often encountered flashing “12:00”), and the user calibration for the oven temperature is not saved after being set.

To set temperature calibration follow these steps:

  • Press “Bake” (upper bake will calibrate the upper oven, and lower bake will calibrate the lower oven)
  • Enter in “500” degrees
  • Hold down “Bake” again (the same bake as pressed at the start)
  • This should enter the calibration menu.  A number ranging from -35 to +35 (by increments of 5) should be displayed.  The default is “0”.
  • Press “Broil” to toggle between positive and negative ranges and then key in the desired offset (can only be from -35 to +35 by increments of 5).
  • Ex) a +20 degree offset will cause the oven controller to display “330” for an oven cavity that is actually 350 degrees.  Similarly, a -25 degree offset will cause the controller to display “425” for a cavity that is actually 400 degrees.
  • Press “Clear/Cancel” or just idle for a few seconds and the offset will be stored and the display will return to showing the clock.  So if you were to re-enter the calibration menu, it should show whatever number you just keyed in.

The control failure being addressed in this post is when you re-enter the calibration menu and it reads “0” or is blank instead of being stored at the desired offset.

Well we’ve discovered what’s causing this problem and know how to fix it.  Furthermore, we will refurbish the entire board, quickly and reliably, replacing all the components prone to failure and back it up with a two year warranty.  And the best part is that this repair is a fraction of the cost of buying a new controller, or worse yet, a new oven.  So send your malfunctioning controller in to FixYourBoard.com and we’ll get it back up and running like new in no time!

Relevant Jenn-Air model numbers:

ACB6260AB ACB6260AS ACB6260AW ACB6280AS

SCE30600B SCE30600BC SCE30600W SCE4320B SCE4320W SCE4340B SCE4340BC SCE70600B SCE70600W SCE30500W

SVD48600B SVD48600PF SVD48600PG SVD48600PK SVD48600PR SVD48600PT

MEW6627BAB MEW6627BAC MEW6627BAQ MEW6627BAS MEW6627BAW MEW6627CAS

JEW8527AAB JEW8527AAW JEW8530AAB JEW8530AAW JEW8627AAB JEW8627AAW JEW8630AAB JEW8630AAW JEW9627AAB JEW9627AAS JEW9627AAW JEW9630AAB JEW9630AAS JEW9630AAW JEW9527AAB JEW9527AAW JEW9530AAB JEW9530AAS JEW9530AAW

JJW8527AAB JJW8530CAB JJW8530CAS JJW8530CAW JJW8630CAB JJW8630CAS JJW8630CAW JJW8527CAB JJW8527CAS JJW8527CAW JJW8627CAB JJW8627CAS JJW8627CAW JJW9527CAB JJW9527CAQ JJW9527CAS JJW9527CAW JJW8530CCB JJW8530CCW JJW9530CCB JJW9530CCS JJW9530CCW JJW9630CCB JJW9630CCS JJW9630CCW

WW30430W WW27430B WW27430BC WW27430P WW27430PF WW27430PG WW27430PK WW27430PR WW27430PU WW27430W WW27430WC WW30430B WW30430P WW30430PC WW30430PF WW30430PG WW30430PK WW30430PR WW30430PU

Relevant Jenn-Air part numbers:

12001691 12001693 12001914 71001799 71001872 71001977 71002594 71003401 71003424 74006612 74006613 74006614

71001799

Single oven display - front

71001799

Single oven diplsay - rear

Double oven display - front

Double oven display - rear

Single/upper oven relay board


Lower oven relay board