Cross-Compatibility Reference for Common Oven Control Board Part Numbers

Manufacturers and appliance parts dealers have multiple part numbers for each electronic control board in your home range/ovens.  If you’re looking to get one of these parts or have it repaired by this PCB repair company, it will be helpful to know all of the different part numbers applicable to your unit.  Fortunately for you, we are providing this handy reference chart for the most common oven control boards coming through our lab…see below.

 

Electronic Control Board Rebuilds

Electronic Control Board Rebuilds

 

Oven Control Board Part Numbers Compatibility Reference Table

PART NUMBERAlternative Part Numbers
8302319W10406070, 8301917, 8302152, 8302319R, 2025673, AH3497633, AP5272198,EA3497633, PS3497633
2307028W10219463, AP4411082, 2252111, 2223443, 2303934, 2307005, W10185291, 1548001, AH2360723, EA2360723, PS2360723
44528908302967, AP3767567, 4451991, 4451856, 4452898, 4453664, 4453664, 1057546, AH973354, EA973354, PS973354
WB27K5048AP2025104, 346514, WB27K5119, WB27K5119
44519918302967, AP3767567, 4451856, 4452890, 4452898, 4453664, 4453664, 1057546, AH973354, EA973354, PS973354
44536648302967, AP3767567, 4451991, 4451856, 4452890, 4452898, 1057546, AH973354, EA973354, PS973354
W10219463AP4411082, 2307028, 2252111, 2223443, 2303934, 2307005, W10185291, 1548001, AH2360723, EA2360723, PS2360723
WB27K5040AP2025100
WB27K5047AP2025103
WB27K5073AP2025121
WB27K5107WB27K5140, AP2025145, WB27K5162, WB27K5107, WB27K5140, WB27K5162
44528988302967, AP3767567, 4451991, 4451856, 4452890, 4453664, 4453664, 1057546, AH973354, EA973354, PS973354
WB27K5190AP2025165
8303883W10340941, AP4909214, W10244191, 8303817, 8303883R, 1877910, AH3489770, EA3489770, PS3489770
14-33-347486752, AP2836528, 35-00-571, 487604, 35-00-751
WB27K5195AP2025167, WB27K5170, WB27K5195
W10121049W10219462, AP4429562, 2304135, 1548000, AH2360722, EA2360722, PS2360722
486752AP2836528, 14-33-347, 35-00-571, 487604, 35-00-751
8302967AP3767567, 4451991, 4451856, 4452890, 4452898, 4453664, 4453664, 1057546, AH973354, EA973354, PS973354
2252159AP3772918, 2221501, 2221522, 2215946, 2254739, 2254739, 2252071, 8201521, 2252097, 2252095
WB27X5482AP2026716
492069AP3383664, 14-38-903, 16-10-660, 35-00-760, 431463, 486329, 486792, 00491433, 491433
WB27K5046AP2025102, WB27K5116, WB27K5116
Y0315570AP3970755, 0315570
WB27K5140AP2025145, WB27K5107, WB27K5162, WB27K5107, WB27K5162
4452242AP3030378, 4452242R
WB27K5123AP2025136
4448876AP2929179, 4448876R
318010700AP2127072, 499452, AH440925, EA440925, PS440925
31944801AP4041311, 0315569, Y0315569, Y0315569, W10171687
7601P214-60AP382957, 7601P214-60R, W10125294,, AP4103856, 879478
7601P432-60AP4009450, 12001620, 74002006, 74002007, 74002966, 74002967, 74002968, 400597, 74002006, 74002967, 74002007, 74002966, 74002968
44519864453661, AP3175498, 4453165, 4453135, 4452904, 4453379, 939594, AH731496, EA731496, PS731496
WB27K5172AP2025155
WB12K005WB27T10083, AP2632694, WB12K10, WB12K12, WB12K5, WB12K0010, WB12K0012
WB19X266AP2022869, 342146
7601P233-60AP4102875, 4381514, 709272, AH2090625, EA2090625, PS2090625
WB27K5210AP2025174, WB27K5120, WB27K5121, WB27K5121
8301917W10406070, AP5272198, 8302319, 8302152, 8302319R, 2025673, AH3497633, EA3497633, PS3497633
Y04100264AP4283511, 04100264, 704729, 04100264R, 7-4729, Y704729, 1242523, AH1754947, EA1754947, PS1754947, Y04100264R, Y704729
7601P510-60AP4283511, 04100264, 704729, 04100264R, 7-4729, Y704729, 1242523, AH1754947, EA1754947, PS1754947, Y04100264R, Y704729
44528928186024, AP3177932, 4453193, 4452900, 961211, AH734569, EA734569, PS734569
44529008186024, AP3177932, 4453193, 4452892, 961211, AH734569, EA734569, PS734569
3169256-A3169258, AP3095479, 3182391
2307028HW10219463, AP4411082, 2252111, 2223443, 2303934, 2307005, W10185291, 1548001, AH2360723, EA2360723, PS2360723
WB27K5213AP2025177
62692AP3390975, 701002, 755676, 82983, 82759, 82382
3169257-A3169259, AP3095480, 3182392

Dead GE double oven? Transformer or Controller? Troubleshooting Guide

This guide will help you identify what problems you may have in the power supply to the electronics in your GE double oven.  Some symptoms you may be experiencing include, but are not limited to:
  • Blank display or no beeping
  • F1 error code
  • Oven seems dead

Generally, these are signs of a failed controller, but sometimes blank display or dead oven are simply the result of a failed transformer.  I say “simply” because it is much less expensive and much easier to replace/fix the transformer than it is the controller.  The objective of this post is to help you figure out which is the faulty part so you can send the right one to www.FixYourBoard.com to be repaired.

You’ll need an AC voltmeter as well as a basic tool set handy (pretty much just the right sized screwdriver).

The first thing to do is cut the breaker to your oven before you start taking it apart – we don’t want anybody getting killed by high voltage.

Next, you’ll need to expose your controller.  Refer to this post for help if you don’t know how to access the control unit.  There is no need to disconnect anything – that could actually make your measurements useless.  Once it’s exposed, make sure you can comfortably touch the various wiring harnesses with the voltmeter probes.  If it’s going to be a struggle, you may want to demount the unit from the panel to get some more slack.

Now, turn the breaker back on.  You’ll need to be very careful from here on.  Even though the controller is mostly a low voltage device, there are still points of high voltage on the relay board, and you can still cause electrical damage if you probe the wrong places.  Wall power goes into a transformer somewhere off the control module, and the transformer steps the wall power down to low voltage and routes that to the control board.  The low voltage comes into the board at the white wiring connector labeled J1.  It’s near the black connector receiving the clear, thin ribbon cable from the keypad (see photo).

The transformer sends two separate low voltages to the control board, 21.5 VAC and 4.6 VAC.  These voltages are approximate: as long is you’re in the ballpark, you should be good.  Also, it’s important to note that there are many variations of this control module.  Yours may look a bit different from the one depicted below, but you should still be getting the same supply from the transformer.  The photo shows a unit with all the wiring detached – yours should have a wiring harness occupying the J1 connector, but you should be able to stick the voltmeter probes along the wires into the sockets of the harness to take measurements.  If not, cut the breaker, disconnect the harness from J1 connector, turn the breaker back on, and probe the bottom side of the harness.  You should measure voltages according the photo.  Note that the empty slot is referred to as pins 3.

GE double oven electronic control board

Probes on pins 1 and 2 is one measurement. Probes on pins 4 and 5 is a separate measurement. The empty slot is referred to as Pin 3.

If you measure the proper voltages, then you know the transformer is not the issue.  Make sure the wiring harness is well connected, clean, and making good contact.  If you’re still having problems as described at the beginning, then the controller is the problem, and you should send it to FixYourBoard.com for repair.

If you aren’t reading these voltages, then you either have a bad transformer, or bad wiring.  Cut the breaker, and follow the wires back to the transformer.  These four wires come out of the secondary side of the transformer.  There should be another two wires going into the other side of the transformer, the primary side.  With the breaker on, you should measure 120VAC going into the primary.  I shouldn’t need to tell you how DANGEROUS 120VAC is.  If you measure 120VAC at the primary, check to see if you get 21.5 and 4.6 right at the secondary.  If not for either one, then the transformer is definitely bad and you should contact FixYourBoard.com for repair.  If you have these voltages right at the transformer, but not at the board, then the wiring has broken down somewhere between and needs to be fixed.  If you’re not getting 120VAC into the transformer primary, then you have a serious electrical wiring problem in your wall which should be addressed by a professional (e.g. electrician).

I hope you found this guide helpful! Remember you can always email info@fixyourboard.com with questions.

-Young Padawan